Break In New Motorcycle - BMW G310R Forum
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 10:18 AM Thread Starter
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Break In New Motorcycle

There's a lot of discussions about how to properly break in a motorcycle. Wouldn't want to do something wrong and damage the bike in any way. So how would you break it in?

I've heard of the low and high rev break in method and then there's the low speed method for a certain amount of miles, generally around 500.
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 10:39 AM
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Typically the owners manual will give you a method to break in the motorcycle, I would just follow that. A lot of people have their own methods, some just don't follow one at all though and go hooning as soon as they get it lol
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 11:42 AM
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Yeah, there's a lot of "ancient wisdom" floating around about engine break-in. But modern engines are built to tighter tolerances and use better materials than older engines. Following the owner's manual instructions, as Sidewinder says, is your best bet. But absent that, my dealer's advice on the last two, modern BMWs I bought was pretty straightforward: run the bike up and down through the rev ranges and gears until the first service (600 miles), and avoid lugging the engine or running long stretches at the same RPM. There's no need to baby it. In fact, making the engine work fairly hard will help seat the piston rings and avoid excessive oil use. But don't wring its neck. Be moderately aggressive, if that makes sense.

I've followed my dealer's advice on my last two BMWs, and I've never had to add any oil between 6,000 mile service intervals on either of them.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-06-2017, 10:10 AM
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That sounds pretty straightforward. Considering you've used that method for the last two modern bmw bikes that you've owned, I can't see why it wouldn't work for the G310 either. I don't think I'll be able to contain myself and not ride it semi-aggressively. Some people say you shouldn't enter the higher rpms at all and keep it real low until your first service... there's no way I can do that lol.
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-06-2017, 10:17 AM
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So shift gears as much as I can and give it the occasional rev? At least it'll give me plenty of practice rowing through the gears.
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-06-2017, 01:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlickRick View Post
Some people say you shouldn't enter the higher rpms at all and keep it real low until your first service... there's no way I can do that lol.
While that used to be true back in the day, that's bad advice for modern engines. You're much more likely to prevent a good run-in (and perhaps even damage the engine) by lugging it in the lower rpms. Smoothly running the engine through the entire rpm range, from idle up to near redline, is key. And not keeping it in any rpm range for long. So no droning down the freeway, at least initially.

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Originally Posted by LiquidCool View Post
So shift gears as much as I can and give it the occasional rev? At least it'll give me plenty of practice rowing through the gears.
Yep, I try to think of it like kneading a loaf of bread. You want to work it, and mix all the ingredients thoroughly.

Then change the oil to remove all the run-in cruft, and retighten all the bolts at the first service. Then you should be good to go.

Free advice, and worth every penny!
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-08-2017, 07:27 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice guys! It'll also be a good chance for me to try my hand at changing oil for the first time at around 500-600 miles. I think that's the average mileage where people make the first oil change.
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 09:46 AM
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Free advice is the best advice! Sometimes not taking the free advice can cost you a lot though
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-03-2017, 07:32 PM
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The riders manual is now available for download at BMW's website. Pretty much only the basics are listed, and maintenance schedules, but there are no specific "break-in" procedures listed.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-05-2017, 01:16 AM
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Hmm... now that's a bit of a pickle for people that were essentially relying on it. Perhaps just asking someone at the dealership would work out as well.
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