Metzeler Tourance Tyre pressure G310GS - BMW G310 R/GS Forum
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-11-2017, 03:30 AM Thread Starter
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Metzeler Tourance Tyre pressure G310GS

My new G310GS came with Metzeler Tourance tyres.When I picked it up from the dealers I asked what tyre pressure they'd put in, 38-42 psi he replied, thats what we put in all the GS's. That sounded about right for a 1200GS but a bit high for a light weight like the 310GS. Then we checked the 310 manual and BMW recommends 1.7-1.9 bar or 25-28 psi, which seemed a bit soft to me and the dealer. I decided to go for 34-38 psi until I did more research.

After a bit of googling it turns out that BMW's 25-28 psi is what the adventure boys are recommending on the dirt, and 38-42 psi on the tar. These are the figures for the big adventure bikes and Im still thinking that a light weight bike like the 310 would be more in the mid 30's. Oil threads and Tyre pressure threads are notorious for a huge variation of opinions but Id like to ask what pressures other GS riders are using.







Today I rode 80ks on dirt and sand and another 100ks on tar. I still had 34-38psi in the tyres and on the tar they felt fine, (i really like the tourance tyres btw)
I rode the Plomers Point Rd from Crescent Head to Port Macquarie. The first section of the 30k trip was in reasonable conditions, the road had been graded for the camping areas, and didnt present any difficulties. After that a 4X4 only sign and the road quickly descended into deep mud holes resembling hippo baths and long stretches of soft sand which quickly brought me to a 1st gear crawl. In the sand the rear wheel sunk in quite deep, but I kept the bike moving slowly. If I went too slow i stalled, too fast the front wheel would sometimes take on a will of its own. In retrospect I had too much pressure in the tyres for such soft ground, and I didnt have a tyre gauge or pump. They have to be in my kit next time. After a real hard hot slog without water, I came out the other side and back onto graded gravel at Port Macquarie. Water also needs to be in the kit. Plus a *** and a lighter.
















I took the Maria River Rd back to Crescent. This is a graded, gravel, well used back route to Kempsey which I imagine would be a bit of a race track. I felt comfortable at 60-70 kph, and the GS could have gone much faster. Once the road got into Kempsey Shire it became corrugated with lots of hidden pot holes but the GS didnt seem fazed by that. The tyre pressures were ok but might have been softer on the fast gravel.

When I got back on the 100kph hotmix the 310 just took off, handling beautifully, for a fast freeway stretch then home. The 310GS pulled up well, nothing had fallen off, Sometimes it was challenged by the conditions, other times sailed through and I was the one holding things up, Afraid the 310GS aint that shiney anymore but this is why I bought it.

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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-11-2017, 05:29 AM
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great ... a GS actually being used off-road ... looks brilliant...
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-11-2017, 11:12 AM
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great ... a GS actually being used off-road ... looks brilliant...
The amount of GSs and XTs that I see travelling only on the highway is astonishing. Here in Rhodes the amount of dirt/stone roads is big; one would think that exploiting the bike's unique feature to your advantage would be no.1 priority but everyone always prefers the tar.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-11-2017, 12:28 PM
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wow look at the area
its raining cats and dogs here and to cold to ride.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-11-2017, 02:44 PM
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Who is complaining about the weather.
Your pictures look GREAT !

My bike came back from my dealer today and just before I got ready to pick it up, my dealer called me and asked if it was okay if he
could bring the bike (by Truck)
Because it was raining, the bike was still very clean ..................... I hesitated ............ for a second. YES, please, bring it !
Beamer is back now with a new waterpump (and gaskets), a new clutch cable and new front brake reservoir.

SUPER !!!!!!
Now hoping for some Australian weather .................................................. ..
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-12-2017, 03:34 AM
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Originally Posted by R1deS1uT View Post
BMW recommends 1.7-1.9 bar or 25-28 psi, which seemed a bit soft to me and the dealer. I decided to go for 34-38 psi until I did more research.
Good question about the tyre pressure for the GS. Mine came from the dealer set at the manual settings (1.7 - 1.9 bar). I changed it without thinking (or checking the manual) to 2.2 - 2.3 bar that is the recommended for the R, 'cause that's just what I know.

Thinking on your comments and experience I would say that the manual would be the correct pressure to run, long experience with BMW leads me to follow their recommendation in the manual. The Tourance tyres have different sidewall construction to the road tyres and this will be one of the factors for the lower than what I am used to (i.e. road) pressure recommendation.

That said, running 2.2 - 2.3 bar has for me yielded great on tar performance. I'll drop the pressures next time I get to ride my local twisties to see if there is much in the way of handling degradation or improvement.

I do think that the 2.5 - 2.9 bar (36 - 42psi) pressure are way too high for this bike, that is for the 230 - 270Kg boxer bikes with firm side walled PR4's or Angel GT's.

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-12-2017, 06:53 AM Thread Starter
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I do think that the 2.5 - 2.9 bar (36 - 42psi) pressure are way too high for this bike, that is for the 230 - 270Kg boxer bikes with firm side walled PR4's or Angel GT's.
Im agreeing with Eccles. I was planning to go drop down to 30-34psi on the next ride. maybe I should go down to 25-28 just to see.

I also jacked up the pre load on the rear suspension to the 4th notch on todays run which made the bike feel more solid over bumps and got rid of a spongy feeling that I was getting occasionally.

Took the afternoon to ride to a dirt road through Yarriabini National Park. Sun was out after morning showers and the road was dry. I found a good well graded gravel road through beautiful forest that climbed up a small mountain with fantastic views of the coast. Up until now most of my riding has been on tarmac except for a few distastrous trips down dirt tracks ending up in me dropping the bikes so I've been spending a bit of time on you tube looking at dirt riding basics. The two I worked on today were standing on the pegs with weight over the front wheel and NOT using my front brake. I was riding pretty cautiously and pleased to find the engine breaking combined with abs rear wheel brake worked well on down hill gravel.





























It was magical in the forest and exactly what I wanted from the 310GS. When I got to a servo I had 200ks on the trip meter, took 7 ltrs which worked out 28.5ks/l. I decided to try 98 octane and for the 50k run home on the highway thought the engine ran very smooth, i think an improvement. Im really bonding with this little bird, it just keeps on ticking boxes. loving it, on all roads.


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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-13-2017, 07:40 AM Thread Starter
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Getting used to the GS

I did reduce the tyre pressure from 34-38psi to 26-30psi, just a touch above 25-28psi in the manual, for todays ride. It was hard to notice any discernable difference to tell the truth. I rode on bumpy patch work tar, well graded dirt, sand, highway, back to loose gravel and finally fast 100kph+ twisties on good hot mix. The bike stuck like glue all day especially on the fast bit. It was weird that there was little difference though.

Had another cracker run looking for new dirt, first along a sandy track by the river, then I travelled up some valleys. The valleys up here are bitumen for the first 40 or so Ks then turn into dirt. Each Valley also has these dirt roads spanning the ridges to the next valley 40ks along, and it was these roads that Ive been wanting to explore on the GS. I did about 180ks, today, at least half of it on dirt.
















There had been a rally through many of the roads over the weekend and gravel was spread everywhere but generally they were in quite good condition. Although Im only crawling along at 40 or 50kph I'm feeling more confident the more I ride and a couple of times I opened it up to 70 and the bike stayed stable. Had one Ohcrap! moment when I leaned the bike into a corner and lost grip but I managed to stay upright. The big thing is staying off the front brake especially on the down hill stretches. Hardly saw a car all day. These roads are generally well graded for log trucks and the school bus, but are nearly all loose gravel and you never know what's around the corner, that plus erratic phone coverage and riding solo means caution before thrills. Despite this it was a great ride with thunderstorms circling, and it was a nice contrast when the roads turned back to tar and I could let rip.

The only weird thing was several times the engine idle went up to 4000rpm and would get stuck there. Im going to have to get the BMW shop to do a diagnostic scan to see whats malfunctioning. Only problem so far, and up to 700ks in 3 days, will have to get its run in service organised.

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-14-2017, 04:38 AM
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Great pics R1deS1ut.

I checked the tyre pressures and they had been set at 2.5 - 2.8 by the dealer at the 1st service. Like you I dropped the pressure to the manual settings of 1.7 - 1.9 and for good measure set the shock to the 3rd click for preload as I now carry gear 'n stuff in the top box.

Quick run on my local twisties confirmed that settings in the manual are just fine for the tar, so will stick with those settings. Took a breather by the river then bolted back home, walking in the front door with yet another silly grin

Loving this bike!
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-14-2017, 11:43 PM Thread Starter
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I took my GS back to the dealer today to get the first 1000k service and to get them to look at the 4000rev idle problem. Of course the bike decided it was going to idle normally after 2 days of mucking up. The long and the short of it was they needed me to leave the bike with them til about friday and gave me their demo 310GS to ride in the meantime. The demo had 350ks so it was interesting to compare. It felt tighter and higher than mine, and felt quite hard and a bit twitchy on the Hwy home. Got home and let the tyres cool down and then checked them. As I expected, they had way too much air pressure in the tyres, 38-45psi. let air out to 34-38psi and will take it out later to test it.

Here is an interesting experiment from a Visordown tyre thread;
Start with the bike manufacturer's recommendation in the owners manual or underseat sticker. This is the number they consider to be the best balance between handling and tire wear. Further, if you're running alloy wheels on poor pavement, consider adding 2 psi to the recommended tire pressure just to reduce the likelihood of pothole damage. Check your tire pressure regularly.In order to get optimum handling a tire has to get to its optimum temperature which is different for each brand of tire. Most of us don't have the equipment needed to measure tire temperature directly so we measure it indirectly by checking tire pressure since tire pressure increases with tire temperature. Tire temperature is important to know because too much flexing of an underinflated tire for a given riding style and road will result in overheating resulting in less than optimum grip. Overpressurizing a tire will prevent the tire from getting up to the optimum operating temperature and performance again suffers.A technique for those wanting to get the most out of their tires on the street is to use the 10/20% rule. First check the tire pressure when the tire is cold. Then take a ride on your favorite twisty piece of road. Then, measure the tire pressure immediately after stopping. If the pressure has risen less than 10% on the front or 20% on the rear, the rider should remove air from the tire. So for example, starting at a front tire pressure of 32.5 psi should bring you up to 36 psi hot. Once you obtain this pressure increase for a given rider, bike, tire, road and road temperature combination, check the tire pressure again while cold and record it for future reference.Each manufacturer is different. Each tire model is different. A tire design that runs cooler needs to run a lower pressure (2-3 psi front) to get up to optimum temperature. The rear tire runs hotter than the front tire, road and track. So the rear tire cold-to-hot increase is greater.Dropping air pressure has the additional side effect of scrubbing more area.For the track you'll have to drop the cold tire pressure an additional 10/20%.
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