Mongolia-UK on a G310GS !!! - Page 2 - BMW G310 R/GS Forum
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post #11 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-20-2018, 02:46 PM Thread Starter
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Enjoying these reports thanks! Was anything found with the rear end wobble?

Not that she has mentioned


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post #12 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-30-2018, 03:34 AM Thread Starter
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Amy's latest update from her mammoth trip from Mongolia to the UK, riding solo on her Rally Raid kitted BMW G310GS.......

"After leaving Almaty I headed for Charyn Canyon and to Lake Kaindy.
Charyn Canyon is only a couple of hours for Almaty and (if you're into interesting facts) is apparently only second in size to the Grand Canyon. It's impressive alright!
Next up was Lake Kaindy. I arrived late in the afternoon because I took some back roads to get there (or may have got a bit lost). So set up camp and chilled for the night.... literally.....it was a very cold night, but thankfully with my good sleeping bag and thermals I slept like a baby, never underestimate the value is having good quality gear! The next morning I walked down to the lake, which is a 10 min walk down a track, and enjoyed the serenity. It was hard to drag myself away to get going, but Kyrgyzstan was waiting.
Thankyou beautiful Kazakhstan!"
Amy's latest update from her mammoth trip from Mongolia to the UK, riding solo on her Rally Raid kitted BMW G310GS.......


"After leaving Almaty I headed for Charyn Canyon and to Lake Kaindy.
Charyn Canyon is only a couple of hours for Almaty and (if you're into interesting facts) is apparently only second in size to the Grand Canyon. It's impressive alright!
Next up was Lake Kaindy. I arrived late in the afternoon because I took some back roads to get there (or may have got a bit lost&#128540. So set up camp and chilled for the night.... literally.....it was a very cold night, but thankfully with my good sleeping bag and thermals I slept like a baby, never underestimate the value is having good quality gear! The next morning I walked down to the lake, which is a 10 min walk down a track, and enjoyed the serenity. It was hard to drag myself away to get going, but Kyrgyzstan was waiting.
Thankyou beautiful Kazakhstan!"
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post #13 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-30-2018, 03:36 AM Thread Starter
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Proof of life, Amy Harburg and her lilí Rally-Raid Products BMW G 310 GS are alive and well, doing it tough somewhere high on the very remote Pamir Highway, Tajikistan. ✊️ ĎGo light, go far, go fastí




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post #14 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-30-2018, 03:46 AM Thread Starter
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She's got another report in..........GO AMY !!

Kyrgyzstan - Part 1.

Crossing into Kyrgyzstan was an instant change in scenery. It was so green with fields of lush crops, trees and super friendly people. I stayed in Karakol at the Riverside Guest House for a couple of nights.
The ride along Issyk Kul Lake was beautiful and it feels like you could be in the Mediterranean somewhere. The water was so blue and there were lovely little lakeside villages scattered along it.

It's worth taking it slow for a few reasons. Not just the scenery, but also the police love to catch out travelers speeding. It's all a total scam really! Anyway (apparently!!) they got me doing 60km in a 40km zone on a very dodgy speed camera. It was kinda funny because I knew they were just after money/bribe, so I played the fake wallet game. Sure, I ended up paying a little bit of money 220som (about $4 Aus) but it was a lot less than the initial 3000som they wanted. Also I intentionally wasted about 20min of their time by being politely annoying . I don't know who won the game, but I left thinking it was all a bit of a joke!

Next up was Lake Song-Kul high up in the mountains. The road/track up was my first real mountain pass and I was so excited to be up in the snow line with Pepper. My Lil GS all the way from Australia to the snow of Kyrgyzstan, it was a great moment for us!
I stayed on the lake in a great Yurt camp. Luckily the weather was perfect and I got to see a beautiful sunset over the lake and the next morning was perfect for riding!


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post #15 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-14-2018, 04:28 AM Thread Starter
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also, Amy has sent her latest update of her solo trip from Mogolia to the UK:

Kyrgyzstan is an adventure riders paradise.....if you know where you are going!! I certainly got my money's worth after I left Song-Kul and learnt a valuable lessons about making smart decisions on roads that aren't on a map!
The days started well enough. I was given a tip from some cyclists about a nice road heading north from Song-Kul, and indeed it was a great road!
It lead me over a pass and down through a small active mine (coal- I think) then through a beautiful valley. The scenery was awesome and I was pinching myself. This route put me a bit to far north from where I really wanted to be, so I started looking for a road back south. Not far out of a town called Chaek I saw a sign saying 'Kazarman 96km'. Brilliant, I thought, That was easy! But I couldn't find it on a map, and my GPS had no clue where I was! It became clear very quickly it was a road under construction.
First lesson - don't follow these!
After about 30km the road turned into a serious construction area, then soon after it just plain stopped halfway up a mountain side. Bugger! So I went back to where I had seen some site huts to ask for directions. It just so happens that the site foreman was there and offered to show me another way through. Brilliant! Second lesson - sometimes its better to know when to just turn back and take the long way around.
Anyway, I started following the workmen about 5km up a goat track carved into the side of the mountain. Then we stopped and they said "we need to pick up some explosives".....this is where I started thinking this wasn't such a great idea. The next 5km was just plain scary, even their 4wd truck struggled up the track. It was deep bulldust, rocky and the drop off the side was at least 200m down to the river. Soon we came to the end of the road....again. An excavator was litterey digging out the side of the mountain to make the road. The cool part was that I was getting a road built for me
The foreman said in a few minutes we'll have a way through for you, then we are going to blast the rest.....
True to his word, the excavator dug a way through for me. But it wasn't remotely rideable. Well not for me on a loaded 310GS. It took 4 of us to get Pepper through the 50m of excavated ground of boulders and deep holes. My goodness it was hard! It was also seriously hot, at least 35 degrees.
After we got my bike through the forman said I should be right from here...wrong! I rode another couple hundred metres and came to another pile of rock blocking my path.
It was here I went to put the side stand down and as I lent the bike over I felt it shift and really lean over. I stood her upright again and looked down to see the side stand had snapped and was now dangling from the wires...O ****! On closer investigation I could see the side stand had broken off at the frame of the bike.
I leant Pepper over on a pile of rocks then walked back up to where the excavator and the men were working getting ready to blast the road. I told them of the blocked road and they said they would send the excavator down to clear the road soon. I walked back to my bike and set about figuring out how to MacGyver a fix on my sidestand. Thankfully the wires were all fine and the switch still intact. After a bit of fiddling I just used tape and zip ties to make sure the switch was activated and hold the stand in place. No longer had I got it all sorted, the excavator came down and cleared the path.
The forman offered me to stay and watch the blast, but I was just focused on getting out of there, I still had 40 odd km to go to Kazarman. I thanked them again and set off.
The track didn't really improve and it was 40 of the scariest km I've done! Seriously I had arm pump by the end. On the positive side the scenery was epic!. Eventually I reached a bridge and rejoined the main track to Kazarman. Finally I reached the end of the road construction and got to a gate. The guards here were not happy at all that I had come through the road and asked me a heap of questions. Ironically my saving grace here was that I couldn't get off my bike because of the side stand. It got a bit tense for a bit, but they could see the problem with my bike and eventually let me through the gate. I got out of there quick smart! Thankfully Kazerman was just down the road and I stayed at a lovely
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post #16 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-14-2018, 12:00 PM
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Just Wow
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post #17 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-14-2018, 01:21 PM Thread Starter
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Exactly, who says you need a big bike for a big adventure......just big imagination !!
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post #18 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-14-2018, 05:12 PM
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Very, very cool.

2014 R1200R, 2016 R1200RT (Gone but not forgotten); 1971 R75/5; 2018 G310R
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post #19 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-15-2018, 09:07 AM
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What an inspiration.

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Other Bikes:
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post #20 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 06:32 AM Thread Starter
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For those wondering where Amy is on her Mongolia-UK overland trip with "Pepper", her trusty G310GS..........here is an update, this girl and her bike certainly are covering some fantastic tracks, and giving our Level 2 Adventure kit a thorough testing.

"Uzbekistan

I had been looking forward to traveling through Uzbekistan, not so much for the riding, but for the cultural aspects! Uzbekistan was essentially the epicenter of the Silk Road. The place where historical East meets West. The main cities have preserved it's significant original architecture, and are still achingly beautiful. It was almost hard to fully appreciate the age and historical importance of it all.

A little travel note.... At the time i applied for my visa Uzbekistan had rather strict travel rules (I think it may have changed now). To obtain your Uzbek visa you have to provide hotel bookings and nominate dates for where you will be. It's not hard to organise, and of course once you have your visa you can easily change your hotel bookings. But....you still have to register each night at a hotel. This information WAS checked at the border when I left.
Also if I thought the fuel was bad in Tajikistan (which, it OMG is!) - Uzbekistan was next level. Sure the fuel stations look new, but the fuel itself is bright yellow and leaves your hands covered in white powder. My #Guglatech filters were again in constant use!! To save your engine, these things are a must!!

First city visited on my route was Samarkand. Like all of them, it has an "old" part of town, which is where I was staying. How I managed to find my guest house through the maze of cobble stoned alley ways was more pure luck than planned navigation.

Of course, no visit to Samarkand is complete without visiting the impressive Registan Ensemble. I wish I had had the energy to go there after sunset to get that quintessential night time photo, but I was just to tired to stay up that late. The Mosque's were impressive too and worth braving the heat for. Samarkand is beautiful, however it is a bustling metropolis and was a bit of a culture shock after the Pamirs.

Next up was Bukara. I really liked it here and gave myself two days to experience it. Sure, it's a bit touristy, but, it has a great feel, especially at night. To be honest, I just liked the ease of it. I felt relaxed and actually enjoyed that touristy atmosphere. It was nice just to blend in a bit! I could have easily stayed for several days. It's also not the bustling metropolis that Samarkand was.

One drawback to traveling on a motorbike is obviously the lack of space/luggage to collect souvenirs. Bukhara was loaded with a myriad of enticing trip memorabilia. And the silk rugs!!! OMG the silk rugs!! I could have bought loads of them....but it wasn't to be. I did allow myself one or two small hand sewn silk runners.

The final of Uzbek's significant cities I visited was Khiva. This is a little off the beaten track, and so is again smaller, but in some ways it's the most magnificent and ancient. The old walled city is beautifully preserved. Again I wished I had more time, but two days was all I could afford.

From this point on heading west, Uzbekistan becomes a bit remote and vast. Fuel availability is a bit of a problem, not to mention the poor quality of what is available. My Giant Loop Gas bag was again an invaluable part of my kit.

I did want to go visit the Aral sea and the ships in the now long gone sea, but I just didn't feel confident I could carry enough fuel. As it was I only just managed the distance from Bukhara to Khiva carrying what fuel I could. Also negotiating the sand on a loaded bike....well let's just say, at this stage of the game, I just didn't have the will (or the time for that matter). So in the end I didn't go.

I had been warned that the road West from Khiva to the border was bad. Well it is!! It's almost, possibly equal to the road from Barnaul to Almaty. The one saving grace of this 700km stretch of Steppe is.....I did get to see the Aral sea bed. It gave me a huge appreciation of the man made devastation to this region.

Interestingly, they are in the process of building a new hwy and petrol stations through here, so soon ALL adventure will be removed from accessing this area. So as frustrating as the torn up, potholed road was at times. I'm glad I got to experience it before all of the 'challenge' is gone. Overall Uzbekistan was an amazing experience with a history that is hard to match.




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