Beemer Beemer chicken deener! (Ride report) - BMW G310 R/GS Forum
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post #1 of 86 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 09:06 AM Thread Starter
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Beemer Beemer chicken deener! (Ride report)

please note. This ride report has been assembled from a series of blog posts I made almost in real time over this past spring and summer [2018] - which ultimately saw me riding back and forth (three times in total - 17,500 miles) across the United States and up into parts of neighbouring Canada onboard my G310GS fitted with the Rally-Raid Products 'Adventure' spoked wheel and suspension kit.

I trust this story and associated photographs will not only inspire by featuring highlights of some world class adventure riding destinations in North America, but also illustrate just how capable and versatile (and ultimately reliable too) this smaller BMW bike can be for this kind of day-in and day-out multi-terrain long-distance adventure riding...




Introduction: first posted in April 2018...

Catchy thread title huh?

Yes, I've only gone and bought a bloody BMW...


photo. a brand new G310GS - currently already in pieces on the other side of the country...

I have to say, I'm a firm advocate of Japanese engineering and technology when it comes to adventure and dirt/dual-sport bikes - they might not be 'cutting edge', but that's exactly why I like them - they're proven, reliable and the work - and I don't like spannering on bikes unless I absolutely have to. So taking a punt on a 'euro' ADV bike is going to be all very new to me!

As a good number of you reading this may already be aware, over the past few years I've been involved with developing the Rally Raid Adventure [wheel and suspension] kit for the Honda CB500X, and at the end of 2015 - after I'd ridden one across the USA and back again - including the full length of the Trans-America Trail - I bought my own bike and fitted the spoked wheel and +2" suspension kit, and created what I consider is the best compromise (ie. a genuine 50/50 bike that is equally capable both on road and off) adventure bike, certainly for the kind of long-distance adventure riding I like to do all over North America.

I've covered nearly 30,000 miles on my own CB now, and together with 12,000+ on that original Trans-Am bike, plus a good few thousand more on the UK development and demo bikes with John from Rally Raid, I consider myself pretty well versed in regard to that machine, and personally speaking have no intention of selling my own CB any time soon, or indeed ever...

However, while I've been able to handle anything I've thrown at it, I would concede that in some really technical off-road trail conditions (such as the infamous Rubicon Trail adventure Juan Brown and I embarked on at the end of 2016), a 200Kg bike can prove to be a bit of a handful shall we say...

So in that regard, I'm willing to give this new 'baby' BMW a try... especially as John (at Rally Raid) has been working on a series of similar wheel and suspension upgrades that I have fitted to my Honda, for the budget BMW - to give it the kind of high-quality on and off-road performance you'd expect from a brand that has built it's reputation on being 'adventure' ready, if not all that appropriate - especially the larger 1200cc ones! - but at least with this bike, the basic donor would appear to offer a lot of what the unicorn hunters are looking for?

As a quick run-down of the basic bike shows similar overall dimensions to my own LEVEL 2 Honda CB500X - similar short wheelbase, ground clearance, 17/19" wheels and 7" of travel front and rear. However, where the 310GS immediately impresses is that is is a good 25Kg lighter in weight than the CB, albeit is also has around 33% less capacity and corresponding power from it's 313cc single cylinder engine, compared to the Honda's 471cc parallel twin.

Fortunately, the six speed gearbox in the BMW offers a reasonably wide range of ratios, and it geared for cruising at around 70+mph, with a little more for over-taking (it officially tops out at around 90mph/140kph), so other than at high altitude and/or into a headwind, I'm expecting reasonable brisk on-road performance from the little tyke.

And yes, I say 'expecting' because I've only actually ever ridden one about 200 yards in 2nd gear on a cold frosty morning in the UK last month - so I honestly have no idea how this bike is going to ride in comparison to the CB - although I have it on good authority from Adam Mitchinson (from Rally Raid Products) who rode one for over 5000kms in the Australian outback recently, that it's actually a very impressive trail machine, and immediately grows on you - much as the CB does.


So a couple of months ago I took a punt, and put a deposit on a brand new G310GS at a dealer in Virginia. The reason I bought one on the east coast is that my initial plan is to ride it back to California (where I'm based when I'm in the USA) across the country - on and off-road, proving it's all-terrain abilities much as I did with the original Rally Raid CB500X back in 2015 - sharing the experience with you here on G310R.com, and ultimately to then be in a position to compare and contrast just how well it performs in this sort of long-distance overland adventure role.

Then later in the summer I'm going to be heading north of the border into Canada (as I did last year) to explore some more, and punctuating that trip with a series of all-terrain 'challenges' wherever I can - in an effort to offer you a longer-term appraisal of what it's actually like to live with this bike on a day-to-day basis, and hopefully entertain you all too with some photos and stories about the people and places I experience along the way...

Of course, being that little bit smaller and lighter than the CB, I will also endeavour to push the boundaries between 'adventure' and 'dual-sport' even more with this new bike over the coming weeks and months - and am confidently optimistic that for a lot of weekender style adventure riders (of which most of us are if we're honest), this bike is actually going to be a near perfect compromise - in other words, BMW have already bestowed a traditional 'trail bike' with more comfort and refinement; while Rally Raid have further enhanced it's all-terrain ability with top quality suspension performance and a heavy-duty spoked wheel-set, together with key accessories such as a substantial engine guard.

So for now, I'm going to have to sign off - since I'm still in the middle of packing everything I'm going to need to not only build/prepare the bike for the journey back west, but also the gear I'll be wearing and carrying with me (including my usual compact camping set-up) into the smallest luggage system possible - as not only do Delta charge per checked bag, but I really don't want to leave anything behind, nor have to shelp unnecessary stuff with me on the bike back home.

I get the feeling this is going to be another epic adventure piglet - time to get in your papoose!

More soon,

Jenny x
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post #2 of 86 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 09:34 AM Thread Starter
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Smaller bike - bigger adventure!


Part of the reason I'll be racking up so many miles on this new GS this year is that I've committed to presenting a series of slide-shows and seminars at a number of overland events this summer all over the USA and Canada.

Below is a list of those already scheduled, and if you're planning on attending any of these meetings and events yourselves, of course I'd be delighted to meet you - whether you're interested in the new BMW specifically, maybe want a few hints and tips for Packing Light, or are interested in the CB500X and how it handled my big trip last summer exploring the northern US states and Canada.


photo. My initial outline plan will include riding through all these States and Provinces over the summer, plus presenting at events (listed below) shown in dark blue - with more to be added as the year unfolds...


April - Horizons Unlimited Virginia (Appomattox VA) 26-29th April 2018. This will be the US debut of my new AV presentation: Northern eXposure which features highlights from my extended trip through Canada and the northern/centre United States on my CB500X last year. It will also be the official debut for the Rally Raid G310GS kit in the US.

May - Overland Expo West (Flagstaff AZ) 18-20th May 2018. Yep, less than a month later, I'll endeavour to be over at Overland Expo in Arizona, and you know what that means - another huge cross-country trip in between!

July - Overland Adventure Rally (venue TBC. Ontario, Canada) 6-8th July 2018. The North American 'tour' will continue with my return to the Toronto area, and the Canadian debut of my Northern eXposure presentation. In addition, by then I'll have plenty of miles on board the G310GS, so will be able to offer a preview [presentation] of my travels with the bike so far...

July - BMW MOA Rally (Des Moines IA) 12-15th July 2018. A week later is the annual MOA rally - this year being held in the middle of Iowa. The presentation schedule is still TBC at this stage, but you can expect to see Northern eXposure, plus a combined Q&A style seminar about the development of the Rally Raid GS kit, and my adventures with it so far...

August - Horizons Unlimited Canada West (Nakusp BC) 23-26th August 2018. I'm really looking forward to revisiting and exploring more of British Columbia again this year - plus the opportunity to present at the Horizons weekend too of course! By the time I arrive in BC I will also have racked up a few more thousand miles on the little GS, and hope to have some entertaining video of my further exploration of Montana and Idaho - in conjunction with my good friend and esteemed YouTube videographer Blancolirio (Juan Browne).

September - Horizons Unlimited California (Mariposa CA) 27-30th September 2018. Currently this is my last scheduled [presentation] event in 2018 - that is not including any additional dealer events, or the possibility I might head down to Baja with the GS in October... by now I hope to be able to debut a brand new AV presentation about this summer spent on board the new GS, piecing together the series of challenges together with some hopefully inspiration travel and adventuring.

Hope to see some of you along the way!

Jenny x

Last edited by JMo; 10-22-2018 at 01:48 PM.
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post #3 of 86 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 09:43 AM Thread Starter
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Some new gear...

While the CB is still the star of my [current] Packing Light presentation - and the Northern eXposure slide/video-show too of course - I hope to have some new/additional tips with regard to my latest gear and packing set-up specifically for this new bike (particularly with regard to some additional fuel capacity for those longer desert sections out west...)


photo. New Icon Raiden gear - this is currently my favourite style of adventure/dual sport jacket - it just works so well. The boots are the new Patrol 2 (complete with 'Marty McFly' lacing) - very lightweight, so great off the bike too. Personally I prefer suede palm gloves - hence the Klim Dakar and my trusty Alpinestars wet-weather option.


photo. Piglet gets a new papoose too! This is the Mil-spec Camelbak Mule - enough room for Piglet and my iPad, snacks, essentials, plus 3 litres of water and some maps.


photo. My constantly revised tool-kit. This year I've gone back to individual tools, based around a 1/4" drive ratchet. A few bodge-it spares, plus tyre-irons and a Bestrest compressor in the larger Kriega pouch. All this fits under the seat of my CB500X. Not sure how it's going to work on the GS just yet...

I'll have a few photos of my luggage once I manage to work out how to stash everything I'm going to need to take with me on the plane without falling foul of the TSA rules!

More soon!

Jenny x

Last edited by JMo; 10-25-2018 at 05:17 AM.
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post #4 of 86 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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Build preview... (from blog).

Ha - now that my friends, is what you might call 'moody' (in black)...



...and just wait until you see it with the tail-chop and the black spoked wheels - I can't wait to get my hands on it now!





Well, its been a manic few days here in Roanoke... but the bike build is finally finished, and I got the chance to get a few miles in this evening on pavement and dirt to shake everything down...


photo. I couldn't resist hitting the dirt - with just 13 miles on the clock!

There will be a full build report with plenty of photos to follow soon [ultimately here in the Rally-Raid section], but right now I really need to sleep... going to make a start on the Virginia TAT sections tomorrow!

Jenny x
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post #5 of 86 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 10:01 AM Thread Starter
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Final packing...

On the CB all of my personal and camping equipment is contained in a Giant Loop Coyote bag, with all my tools including a 12v compressor stowed under the seat (and a spare tube tucked inside the left front fairing panel) which means the bike has tools and puncture kit on it at all times, while my luggage can be easily removed should I wish to trail ride unladen for a day for example.

However, on this trip on the GS I'm experimenting with a second bag (the Giant Loop Rogue) as a completely separate holdall for my personal effects - clothes, wash-bag, sandals, charging cables etc. - so that in a hotel I only have to open that one bag, and leave the whole camp and spares* etc. in each side of the Coyote with the top rolled down - so I effectively have three 'pods', with the facility to expand the centre part of the Coyote if I happen to find a must-have souvenir or get really hungry while camping ;o)

*It's worth noting that while there isn't room under the seat of the GS for my compressor, nor it appears enough room in the fairing to stash a tube in the same was as on the CB; there are still a surprising number of nooks and crannies under the GS seat to stow everything else (including my three MotionPro tyre levers) except those two items - which are currently carried in the Coyote instead.




Ultimately I'm hoping to refine my packing even further for this bike during these next few weeks heading back west - even to the extent of deleting the Rogue perhaps, although with my original zip Coyote absolutely full with basically the same gear I'm carrying this year, I can't see how the tube and compressor are going to fit without some extra pouch somewhere on the bike?

More soon - the TAT is calling!

Jenny x
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post #6 of 86 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 10:10 AM Thread Starter
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Chapter 1 - Virginia to California



So, how shall we get this ride report started? - with some actual riding of course!

Day 1: Sunday 22nd April 2018: Roanoke VA via Marlinton WV (the official new start of TAT) to Low Moor VA

264.5 miles in total (inc. 135.5 miles of new TAT)


So I stayed up late again messing around with my photos last night, although I was still packed on on the road by 9am this morning:



As I mentioned above, currently I'm experimenting with a two-bag system (rather than cramming everything into a single Coyote) - with all my camping gear and the compressor/tube in the main bag with the top section rolled down, and all my personal stuff in the 17litre Rogue dry-bag on top.

I like the way it's divided now - especially as I don't have to even open the main bag unless I'm setting up camp - but at the same time, I feel it is not as compact as this bike really deserves. note. This evening I've actually managed to get everything into the roll-top Coyote after all, so it must be slightly bigger than the previous zip version!

Anyway, at least everything has proved nice and secure (after my brief 50 mile test ride yesterday evening), and with everything cinched down as tightly as possible, it was time to hit the road, and maybe find a late breakfast somewhere en route..

The official starting point of the new TAT is actually over the state line in Marlinton West Virginia (where there is food, fuel and motels), although the first dirt section is right on the state-line at the appropriately named "Rider Gap" on highway 39.

Marlinton was approximately 110 miles away from Roanoke, so I plotted a nice back road route that would take up up and down a number of ridges as I wiggled north, providing an excellent opportunity to help break in the engine some more.


photo. There were a trio of these lime kilns alongside the river at Eagle Rock.

I stopped at Eagle Rock, hoping to find an open diner for breakfast, but it looked like it was either shut up for good, or maybe just really tatty and everyone was at church this Sunday morning.



The next town wasn't any good either (my GPS needs an update perhaps, or is this simply a sign of rural economies failing... certainly parts of Virginia seem very poor these days), but I finally found somewhere that was in my GPS, that also happens to be right on the TAT route (typically when heading in the opposite direction), although despite it's shiny exterior, in comparison I felt the food was rather lacklustre I'm afraid to report.

cont.
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cont.

Still, I was finally set up with sugar and caffeine for the time being, so it was time to press on to Marlinton, via, I have to say, some truly epic twisty backroads!


photo. A quick pre-trail check-over of axle nuts, chain etc. and also to check the settings/dial in the suspension a little, after refuelling at the official start point of the latest revisions to the TAT.

I'm not sure why Sam has chosen this particular spot as the 'official' start of the Trans-America Trail - it's a rather shabby gas station and mini-mart next to an equally insalubrious motel a mile or so out on the other side of town. In fact technically the start GPS coordinate appeared to be a few hundred yards away in the middle of afield, so maybe even Sam thought twice about staying there, and simply camped instead ;o)

To be fair, the staff were of that typically Virginian cheery disposition (we're in West Virginia now of course), and the bathrooms clean, the RedBull cold. Kind of all you need really. And then there is the psychological benefit of hoping that things can only get better from here on in! ;o)

Fortunately there are also a number of other options for gas, food and accommodation closer to the centre of the town, and I spied this mural on the way out which personally I thought would make a much better 'official start' point?!



Anyway, I then had to shlep back down highway 39 from whence I'd come - although admittedly it is a lovely ride next to the river in places - since the first dirt section of the TAT is actually 17 miles from the start, at the aforementioned Rider Gap at the summit of the pass that also marks the state line between Virginia and West Virginia:



cont.
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post #8 of 86 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 10:19 AM Thread Starter
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cont.

If I sound a little underwhelmed [with the new TAT extension] so far, its really only because I know I'm under a time constraint this week, plus the forecast is not looking good for the next few days - and the primary reason for me starting on the east coast this year is so that I could ride all of the new sections of TAT in Virginia and North Carolina on my way back west...

I do love the peace and quite in this part of the country though - small and slightly ramshackle rural communities, pretty little farms (those quintessential red wooden barns!), and at this time of year of course - a good number of baby animals in the fields as you roll on by...

However, other than a dozen miles or so of prime gravel forest road along the ridgeback that follows the state line, the initial route was primarily riding on minor paved roads, and though I do love Virginia, I've also done a lot of similar riding here before, so this was both immediately familiar, and a little frustrating, as I knew I still had such a long way to go before I absolutely had to make a run for Arizona in about a week's time.


photo. I feel this is going to be one of those churches that everyone takes a picture of when they ride the new Virginia sections of the TAT.

However, as the afternoon drew on, so too the unsurfaced sections became more frequent, and for an increasingly longer number of miles too - the highlight arguably the snake through a forest and down into Covington - another highlighted food, fuel and motel stop, just off Interstate 64.


photo. At one point I thought the new route had already be thwarted, but it transpired I'd turned up this trail barely a hundred yards before the correct turn - phew!

Although these gravel logging roads were not especially technical (although you had to keep on your toes, as there were a number of washouts due to recent heavy rain), they were the perfect opportunity to get a feel for the new suspension, and how the bike handles in general.

I have to say, I'm impressed with how nimble the bike feels, and how lively it is, baring in mind I am trying to stay below the 6000rpm running-in recommendation for a few more hundred miles at least...

Compared to my Honda (with the Rally Raid LEVEL 2 suspension and wheel kit which gives the CB500X similar ground clearance and travel to the 310GS, coupled with the same size wheels/tyres and wheelbase), the Honda feels a lot more stable and planted I would say - but then that is because I have mine set up soft for grip and traction, at the expense of some outright hammerability perhaps... Conversely, the slightly stiffer sprung (and lighter overall weight) GS really starts to shine once you wick it up to around 40mph or more on the rough dirt roads, where you can really feel the suspension start to work and make the most of the available travel, without blowing though the stroke too quickly.

I like it! But I feel you do have to ride a little more 'on it' to get the best from this bike, whereas the Honda - certainly in regard my own example which has a lot more settling-in miles on it too of course - flatters you if you decide to just kick back and cruise a little more sedately along similar terrain.

Obviously all this is very early days still - the bike has barely 300 miles on the clock yet, so any appraisal is really only a first impression at this stage.

More soon as they say!

Jenny xx
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post #9 of 86 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 11:11 AM Thread Starter
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Day 2: Monday 23rd April 2018: Low Moor VA to Chantilly VA

332 miles (inc. 76 miles of new TAT)


I’d decided to book into the hotel [a nice modern Travelodge, albeit expensive] next door to Penny’s diner where I’d stopped for brunch earlier that day - since it appeared that the majority of the next sector was paved which I reasoned would have offered little opportunity for [wild] camping, while it was probably too far (time wise) to make it to the next town with accommodation before nightfall…


photo. the next morning I finally managed to consolidate all my belongings into the Coyote - including the rolled up Rogue bag inside too - much neater!


As it turned out, while the TAT continues to follow a series of minor paved roads for much of the next sector, it also passes by the entrance to the Potts Mountain Jeep Trail (and associated campgrounds near by) which ought to offer an entertaining diversion*, while allowing you to rejoin the main TAT route a few miles further on... Had I not made commitments to be in Chantilly (in the very north of the State) by that evening, I certainly would have liked to have seen how the GS handled a more technical OHV trail, even though it currently had barely 300 miles on the clock.

*It’s worth reiterating here that while the TAT is a defined route, at the same it’s almost inevitable that you will have to divert at some point along the way - if only due to weather, flooding and other road closures. Indeed in that regard, Sam Correro himself suggests that the most rewarding way to ride the TAT is to consider it as more of a guide - taking you though some excellent off-road riding areas, and close to some unique points of interest too, which in turn offer further opportunities to personalise your trip should you have the time and inclination to explore away from the main route.


photo. the TAT leaves town on a minor paved road, and like the sections though Tennessee and Mississippi, the paved sections offer a unique glimpse of how life in rural small-town America can be very different to what [foreign] tourists might expect it to be?


photo. I definitely need to come back and explore this trail one day!

While much of this morning was spent on minor paved roads, unlike yesterday, there was now far less a sense of frustration, and I'd settled into the swing of riding just for the fun of it again - so much so that I decided not to break at New Castle (on hwy 311 which leads back to Roanoke), but continue a little further south and west on the TAT towards Newport, before I conceded I’d absolutely have to turn round and head north again, to ensure I was in Chantilly by early evening.

To my delight this indulgent endeavour turned out to be the best section of the Virginia TAT so far - Tub Run Road, despite it’s title, is actually far more what you’d consider a traditional ‘trail’ - a rough and rocky in places (but not too rough or rocky) terrace carved into the side of a steep hill, that wound around the contours in a series of hairpin turns - slow in, fast out, typically snick-snicking between third and fourth gear (and sometimes dropping to second on a particularly tight or soft corner) - the little GS was really in its element here, the suspension working and the smooth transmission making it all seem very easy to rag this bike at around 40-45mph on this kind of terrain.



photo. Colour coordination gone mad!


To make a comparison with my CB500X here - while the Honda can be equally entertaining on this sort of terrain (not least due to its overall composure and linear/torquey power delivery), I have to admit that the GS certainly felt noticeably more nimble and eager - allowing you to take a few more liberties by braking later in to the corners, and really cranking the bike over (more like a dual-sport/enduro); and would concede that I found it easier to ride this bike faster than I would probably chose to do so [or consider prudent at least] on the heavier Honda.


Another observation that this trail particularly highlighted was just how good this latest generation ABS on the 310GS seems to be when riding off-road - it feels very much like the Honda system in that it seems to work very well on loose trail conditions like this (ie. not cut-in too early, and/or ultimately then let go and run away with you like the earlier systems used to!) Certainly I never felt the need to disengage the ABS, even when I’d been braking hard into corners - in fact I tended to simply forget it was even switched on - so that’s a big tick for BMW at last.


As I rejoined a minor tarmac road just outside Newport, there was an old wooden covered bridge that had been bypassed, so stopped to take a look:



The Clover Hollow covered bridge was built in 1916 as one of four in the area that crossed over Sinking Creek, although it is the only one left [standing] on public land that you can visit. The town raised funds to repair this local landmark (the names of those who donated have been inscribed the brick paving footpath that approaches the bridge), although I was disappointed to see that someone had spray-painted graffiti on the historic woodwork inside - which is not the sort of thing you tend to see in the USA generally I’ve found.


It was now well after midday, so I marked a waypoint where I left the official TAT route (to rejoin it here in a few days’ time, after Horizons Unlimited), and headed back north, dropping into Roanoke again to refuel the bike and myself before embarking on the long shlep north on highway 29:


photo. yes, it’s a cliche I know…


Although I’d been doing my best to keep the revs below 6000rpm during this initial running in period, I factored that by now any damage would have already been done, so as the odometer passed 450 then 500 miles, I progressively increased my speed to 70 and even 75mph where appropriate (for info. 6th gear seems to equate to 10mph per 1000rpm or thereabouts), and I have to say, the GS continued to impress beyond what you might consider is a rather meagre on-paper specification.

More soon - although perhaps not terribly soon as I’m going to be camping at Horizons for the next four days...

Toot toot for now!

Jenny x
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post #10 of 86 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 11:26 AM Thread Starter
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Ok then, a quick update to try and get everything up to speed...

The last week has been pretty hectic, as not only had I agreed to ride all the way to northern Virginia to meet with the editor of ADVmoto magazine (plus a guest appearance from British travel author Sam Manicom), but then I had to rush back south again to Appomattox to attend the Horizons Unlimited meeting, where I was scheduled to host four separate presentations (the bastards, I only really agreed to three!), over three days...

Day 3: Tuesday 24th April 2018: Chantilly VA

27 miles!

"Pimping my ride"

Having arrived in time for dinner that evening, I was welcomed by ADVmoto editor Carl Parker at his family home, who was also paying host to British travel writer (and a personal friend) Sam Manicom, who over the years has ridden pretty much all over the world, and written a series of books about his travels.

It was great to catch up with Sam, and to actually meet Carl in person (until now we've only communicated via email and Skype), along with his family - and the atmosphere was relaxed and informal - a perfect way to unwind after a 250+ mile highway shlep on the little beemer.



The next morning, we were fortunate to be blessed with some grey skies before the rain came later that morning - and the opportunity to bag a few photos for the magazine, plus a short video interview for their associated website.







note. There are currently a few more photos on the ADVmoto Facebook page, plus will be part of a follow-up feature in the magazine once I've reached The west coast in a few weeks' time.

After another lovely family evening meal, we retired slightly more early this time - having once again put the ADV market in general, and world to rights... as I really had to be be back in Roanoake by the following evening, so that I might pay a final visit to Frontline Eurosports who had supplied my bike, and been so generous in allowing me a corner of their workshop to build up the bike*.

*note. I'll be posting a series of photos and a few notes taken during my initial build of the bike in the main Rally Raid GS vendor section too.

Unfortunately the next day was teeming with rain, and despite a leisurely restaurant breakfast with the boys, I had no choice but to brave the weather for another 250 miles south again...

cont.
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