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Hey all, in Australia we have Penrite branded cleaners. Anyone else use this on their bike and ok?

Haven't used that. But here's what I do.

Clean chain with regular bike wash soap. Rinse off. (That's if you have water handy.)
Spray WD-40 on the chain. Displaces water and lubes the O or X rings.
Use a rag to clean the grit off and wipe up the extra WD-40.

O or X ring chain doesn't need lube inside. Biggest thing is keep the O-ring's 'live'
and remove extra grit and crud. Chain treated that way will last 15K to 20K (+) miles.

Any rate...
 

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I wipe the chain with a rag when muddy then move on with my life.
I mean, honestly, it would be interesting to see if your chain ends up lasting about the same as mine (maintained by the book).

It's another one of those areas where I religiously follow my intervals, while thinking in the back of my head it may not really matter.
 

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I mean, honestly, it would be interesting to see if your chain ends up lasting about the same as mine (maintained by the book).

It's another one of those areas where I religiously follow my intervals, while thinking in the back of my head it may not really matter.
It would be difficult to quantify such a thing but it sure would be exciting to see the data. To be honest, chain lube is an expense I don't need, spraying things gets messy and boring, the chain lube marketing gives me the "jimmies", environmental impact of all this stuff all over the place plus the fact I've never had a chain problem on ANY of my bikes. They are sealed, permanently lubricated units, after all.

Additionally, chains are cheap, I would much rather replace it when needed than keep lubing and adjusting and stretching it.

I think just keeping it clean is key, if you see corrosion perhaps a few drops of WD40 will help with vanity.

...I have been wrong before.
 

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Big thing that wears a (modern) chain out (on a 310)... is mungy grit. Mix of dust, sand, rock and leftover lube.
Grinds the chain joints and wears our the O (or X) rings. It also contributes to wear on the sprockets.
Almost like putting valve grinding lube on a chain.
(On a 'big bike' chain stretch due to engine torque is a big issue, but not a 310.)

I'd 'guess' that not cleaning a chain would reduce it's life by 50% or more. (Depending on where you ride.)
But, heck chain and sprockets are just a consumable wear item.
 

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chain lube is an expense ... the chain lube marketing gives me the "jimmies"
I ignore the marketing and use a very low cost approach. Fortunately, this is an area where the cheapest products work great.

Big thing that wears a (modern) chain out (on a 310)... is mungy grit. Mix of dust, sand, rock ...
I live and commute in very rainy Seattle. The mixture you mention is exactly what my bike collects from the wet roads here in winter.
 

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I ignore the marketing and use a very low cost approach. Fortunately, this is an area where the cheapest products work great.



I live and commute in very rainy Seattle. The mixture you mention is exactly what my bike collects from the wet roads here in winter.
I LOVE SEATTLE, I used to live just north of you in Victoria (on vanisle). Yes, apparently cheap gear lube you just apply with a sponge or a brush after cleaning your chain and sprockets is the best if you feel like maintaining your chain.

At least, from my recollection, Vancouver Ryan/YouTube master said in one of his videos.
 

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I LOVE SEATTLE, I used to live just north of you in Victoria (on vanisle). Yes, apparently cheap gear lube you just apply with a sponge or a brush after cleaning your chain and sprockets is the best if you feel like maintaining your chain.

At least, from my recollection, Vancouver Ryan/YouTube master said in one of his videos.
That's where I disagree. (And that is based on long experience).
Cheap gear lube just adds to the blooddy mess, both on the chain and on your bike.

In the 'Old Days' (pre O-ring)... grab a pie tin, add grease, lay the chain in and bake it in the oven.
Then you would incur the wrath of your GF/spouse/mother.

Grease would last for a few miles. Chain life... maybe a couple thousand unless you took it off road,
then the life expectancy was even less. Some of the bikes (Bultacos, small Hondas etc) had fully enclosed chains,
the life expectancy of chains was pretty good in those, those enclosures kept the grit away !

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive tire Automotive lighting
 

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I have never, in my life, have seen a chain guard like this. What bike is this? I bet the rest of it is equally gorgeous.
That's an old Butaco. Enclosed chains were popular with Enduro and ISDT riders.
Didn't have to touch or worry about chain for a long time. It would get you through the ISDT.

When I was riding in the 'early days' the ISDT was a 'BIG' thing. (ISDT = International Six Days Trial).

Enclosed chains are sill popular on small bikes in the 'third world' countries.

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive tire Automotive lighting


Here's an MZ (Communist Bike) Very clunky... but they worked.

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive tire Automotive lighting
 

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I’ve have read about some cleaning products (solvents) that can penetrate the o rings and dissolve the lube contained and it can be expelled. Also some rubbers are attacked by kerosene and rubber goes away. I’d say use what you know and observe Results. If it works your in. If you chain goes south fast for lack of orings, you‘ll need to buy new chain and try something else. If you don’t know what to use, buy products specific for o ring chains. Amazing products out that lube but are totally dry, no grunge collection, stay clean long time. Many old timers feel the secret is keeping chain clean and only sufficient lube, no more.
l have found wide wide variance in chain life irrespective of care over the years. No explanation for it. Some sort of voodoo science.
Sworn off several times (only shafts) but they are efficient.
 

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I changed my chain and sprockets out at 9,371 miles (~15,000 km) because it was exhibiting kinking likely from deterioration of o-rings. During my 7,023 mile Nova Scotia trip that comprised most of those miles, I lubed my chain once every 1000 miles or so by wiping it clean with a rag and spraying it using a small travel can of Dupont wax based chain lube. I consider chains to be a consumable item like tires; when it shows signs of wear, I replace it.
 
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