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Wondering what type of auxiliary light setups members have on their GS's? if any? I'm considering the DENALI D2 2.0 TriOptic LED Light Kit With DataDim Technology. Wondering if anyone has any direct experience with these or any other Aux lights setups. Would love to see pics of your setup? Currently just finished installing the Hepco and Becker engine and upper crash bars and will likely mount to the bars somewhere. Would love to see pics of similar setups and would be interested in what style of mounting bracket you used. Thanks.
 

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These lights had 7000 lumen output combined and worked very well:





They were very simple to mount. I used a length of alloy tube with rectangular section and found 2 bolts up under the headlight/beak that were perfectly located.
 

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..........Wondering if anyone has any direct experience with these or any other Aux lights setups. .......... upper crash bars and will likely mount to the bars somewhere..............

I've put lights on heaps of bikes. The crash bars can be very handy.


 

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Auxiliary lights

These lights had 7000 lumen output combined and worked very well:





They were very simple to mount. I used a length of alloy tube with rectangular section and found 2 bolts up under the headlight/beak that were perfectly located.
Could you post a picture of where the bar is mounted to and the location of the 2 bolts please. I want to do the same.
 

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Like you accessories

Hi Gtown.
I fitted The standard DMs on mine and they are great. I also used the Denali light mounts which are fully adjustable so you can fit them almost anywhere on the engine bars.
I love the look of your bike with those accessories what and where if you wouldn’t mind telling
 

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the problem is that drivers are blinded by these lights. I have powerful fog lights, but connected them to high beam headlight, and use them only when no one is is facing me.

fully LED headlight conversion is the best solution. you don't need other lights.

i mean, still, I admire your level of dedication, and innovation...:)
 

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Having ridden in several countries besides 48 of the 50 United States I can appreciate your need for auxillary lighting. My experience riding hundreds of thousands of miles in all weather, terrain and potential animal encounters day and night has heightened my awareness of the limits of a single headlight, LED or otherwise. I haven't had the opportunity of riding around Australia, but the mountain and desert terrain of the US appear to have many of the same visibility issues. I've used auxillary lighting in the past and it has been a huge factor in avoiding many unwanted animal encounters as well as avoiding crashes in rough terrain. The extra lighting was also beneficial on many less that optimal riding weather days. Once lighting is installed and properly aimed I've had no oncoming drivers flash me to dim the lights. So, for anyone riding in less than optimal conditions, riding after dark, in areas with wildlife or harsh terrain I highly recommend the use of auxillary lighting for your safety.
 

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Having ridden in several countries besides 48 of the 50 United States I can appreciate your need for auxillary lighting. My experience riding hundreds of thousands of miles in all weather, terrain and potential animal encounters day and night has heightened my awareness of the limits of a single headlight, LED or otherwise. I haven't had the opportunity of riding around Australia, but the mountain and desert terrain of the US appear to have many of the same visibility issues. I've used auxillary lighting in the past and it has been a huge factor in avoiding many unwanted animal encounters as well as avoiding crashes in rough terrain. The extra lighting was also beneficial on many less that optimal riding weather days. Once lighting is installed and properly aimed I've had no oncoming drivers flash me to dim the lights. So, for anyone riding in less than optimal conditions, riding after dark, in areas with wildlife or harsh terrain I highly recommend the use of auxillary lighting for your safety.
Definitely a big plus to have decent lights in the back country environment. And also agree, good quality lights aimed properly are never a hazard for other drivers.

My experience with cheaper $10 type lights has always been bad. They have bad light pattern and poor spread. I avoid them completely. Get good quality lights from certified sources.
 

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They look a bit too close to the turn signal lights and they may make them less noticeable.

Those big lights are for riding out in the sticks through the night and only work on high beam. As such if there were any vehicles approaching close enough to see or care if I was turning, I wouldn't have the spots turned on.


So the turn signals are unaffected by and not less noticeable due to the spots.
 

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the problem is that drivers are blinded by these lights. I have powerful fog lights, but connected them to high beam headlight, and use them only when no one is is facing me.

fully LED headlight conversion is the best solution. you don't need other lights.

i mean, still, I admire your level of dedication, and innovation...:)

I disagree with most of your post.


Big spot/driving lights only blind oncoming drivers if they are left on too close. I only use spot lights on high beam when the oncoming lanes are clear. I do not ride around with them on in traffic. Their primary purpose is to light up country roads to avoid animal strike.


Fog lights on the other hand - true fog lights - should never be connected to the high beam. In foggy conditions seeing down the road is best achieved with a low mounted light. Cars have them at or below bumper level for this reason. Using high beam and/or high mounted spot lights in foggy conditions can result in the rider dazzling themself riding into a blinding field of white. Low beam and low beam connected low mounted lights is the way to go in fog.


Full LED conversion can be far superior to the OEM set-up but cannot even hope to perform as well as good aux lights. I have run 20,000 Lm set-ups on bikes rated at 1Lm at 1000m.
 

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Could you post a picture of where the bar is mounted to and the location of the 2 bolts please. I want to do the same.

Sorry Tukemeister, I've been away from the forum for a long time, having sold my G310GS months ago. I don't have any pics of the bolt location. Just look up under the beak and you will see them easily enough.


The pic of my bike shows roughly where the bar/tube needs to cross under the beak.
 

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What makes of auxiliary lights are people using ?
I just want some extra driving lights, that are an easy diy fit without affecting the warranty. All i'm after is better lighting of the road ahead in the dark. Whn going home from work. North Yorkshire countryside and street lights can't be used in the same sentence (unless its lack of). Size does matter, I would like something in keeping with the look of the bike.
Rigid industries seem ok, Denali seem expensive for my needs.
Any ideas please..
 

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What makes of auxiliary lights are people using ?
I just want some extra driving lights, that are an easy diy fit without affecting the warranty. All i'm after is better lighting of the road ahead in the dark. Whn going home from work. North Yorkshire countryside and street lights can't be used in the same sentence (unless its lack of). Size does matter, I would like something in keeping with the look of the bike.
Rigid industries seem ok, Denali seem expensive for my needs.
Any ideas please..
I saw twisted throttle have D2 on sale recently. I almost bought it 76 bucks, good deal
 

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I disagree with most of your post.


Big spot/driving lights only blind oncoming drivers if they are left on too close. I only use spot lights on high beam when the oncoming lanes are clear. I do not ride around with them on in traffic. Their primary purpose is to light up country roads to avoid animal strike.


Fog lights on the other hand - true fog lights - should never be connected to the high beam. In foggy conditions seeing down the road is best achieved with a low mounted light. Cars have them at or below bumper level for this reason. Using high beam and/or high mounted spot lights in foggy conditions can result in the rider dazzling themself riding into a blinding field of white. Low beam and low beam connected low mounted lights is the way to go in fog.


Full LED conversion can be far superior to the OEM set-up but cannot even hope to perform as well as good aux lights. I have run 20,000 Lm set-ups on bikes rated at 1Lm at 1000m.

Have you tried full headlight conversion? While I have very powerful (Cyclops ) auxiliary lights (not fog lights), the main light is much more powerful.

As to connecting the auxiliary lights to the high beam, it is a matter of preference and what kind of riding you do. Having them connected to high beam also works great as the passing lights.
 
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