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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, here you are with your brand new G 310 GS. You forked over $7000 for the bike and find that you have another $1000 left for upgrades. What do you spend that money on? What do you think are relatively inexpensive upgrades that do a lot to enhance the usability of the bike?
 

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If your over 150lbs I sure would think about upgrading the suspension. Not inexpensive but really “makes” the bike perform. Voltmeter/Usb port, battery monitoring gizmo/app, bashing bars
 

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If your in California or so we can hook up, try mine.
Once you ride with proper suspension, you won’t go back. My 4th BMW and the first that they missed the mark on suspension.
 

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The worst thing with the G310GS is its cheap suspension. The best with the G310GS is its cheap suspension. The suspension is so cheap it doesn't feel bad to throw it away and replace it with something better.
One suspension unit of my old R1200GS (w ESA) cost more than half the entire G310GS.
 

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As far as the suspension goes, is Rally Raid the way to go here?
For us in the Old World, RR is the way to go. For you over there, the cost of shipment is to be considered. I went with RR level 1 on my 2018 GS. That includes rear shock absorber with spring strength suitable to my weight and a new fron spring. I also changed to higher viscosity fork oil.
There are probably many other suspension manufacturers/brands, with US representation, that can fulfil your needs. Whatever you chose, it will be a notable improvement.
 

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Hassle man is correct! You don’t have to sell the bike to buy a new shock.
The Rally Raid is the most cost effective set up. If on real serious budget one could do just the front and rear later but it’s not ideal.
But I have to disagree on one point, there are no cheap parts on a BMW. Questionable quality? Perhaps but not cheap. The only potential cheap part is the nutter clinging to handlebars.
 

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I’d have to look but not that bad and quite prompt. I cheaped out and scored a used tractive shock which I had to change the spring on for fat me. I think shipping on spring was $30 and it was in my hands in four days.
 

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I’d admit I do enjoy getting “Euro” stuff over “Asian” even though often Asian is same. It’s the American in me
 

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we are lucky somebody took up the cause! The “hot“ unit being the Honda CRF 300 everyone and cousin has upgrades for those with more on way.
If you’ve not read it yet, Jenny (JMo) did a super write up on the evolution of RR on the 310 as she was Beta rider on a cross country trip. She’s a gift to riders everywhere. On ADV.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yes, I did see that! Also enjoyed reading her long report about taking the 310 all over the States. She's great.

I have to admit that I'm fascinated by the CRF 300L Rally ever since Itchy Boots got one for her most recent trip. Seems like a solid bike. But the reality is that if you live east of the Mississippi, you'll be spending 90% of your time on pavement rather than dirt, and I think the 310 is a better bike for that.
 

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Almost all GS bike see very little dirt use, just how it is. Nothing wrong with it.
Being realistic about that fact is tough.
What’s nice with the 310 is you can do a dirt road competently stock and one can upgrade. But it is also a great tarmac burner too. I think the Honda would be the choice if you intend to do more dirt than road.
 

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I went a bit different and although the suspension isn't ideal I'd rather run it ragged then replace it. If it ain't broke don't fix it. Once its start weeping or if I ever rode two up maybe and was that upset I'd go for the money.
Crash bars (dropped with no issue), skid plate (plastic was a joke) , some sort of bark buster (just looks more complete and utilitarian).
And obviously tires need attention at some point but rather run them ragged as well. But always my solution is own multiple bikes.... save that $1000, save some more, and buy a true dirt bike or beater.
Everything has quirks or issues so the solution is have a tool or bike for every scenario and mix up the fleet every few years. Terrible financial advice, but bikes are toys for most of us state side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've gone back and forth on the issue of crash bars. For a while, I thought about buying a nice pair of SRC bars and fitting Denali lights on them—like some of the big GS bikes have. But then I realized that those two things alone would set me back about $900.
 

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I'd spend that $1000 for a second set of wheels and tires!
Then you'd have one set for highway tires and another set of wheels for your knobbies. Win-win!
It's like having the right shoes for the task at hand. I've been running multiple wheel sets for years and it's Farkle #1.
 
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