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<<200miles tank not enough considering how comfortable the bike is for long distance journey for its class.>>

There aren't many places in this country (assuming you are in the US) where gas stations are more than 200 miles apart. And you can always strap on an auxiliari container(s) for a bit more range, as suggested in the post above. Also, having a database of gas station location along is helpful.

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Trouble with that view... is you never know if there is a blockage where you need to turn around.
 

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That would depend on your nav gear. My wife’s Honda car re routes her automatic dependent on real time conditions. I’m sure newer navigation gear takes care of that stuff if your smart enough to operate it. That’s where I stumble some.
 

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That would depend on your nav gear. My wife’s Honda car re routes her automatic dependent on real time conditions. I’m sure newer navigation gear takes care of that stuff if your smart enough to operate it. That’s where I stumble some.
Usually don't worry about unexpected detours or re-routes on paved roads... most of the time I worry about it is in the back-country.
Other big thing is ride 120 miles... and find out that the gas station is closed or doesn't have any fuel. (Black Rock Desert etc.)
That's where the extra 50 miles of gas range is very handy.

I don't really count on 200 miles of range either. Going over some mountain ranges in the Western United states... you might get 40 (+-) mpg.
 

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I’m finding the range indicator pretty good. In my traveling days, I’d admit now (years later) I would use RV gas tanks as emergency fuel retainers and carry a length of siphon hose. Worth the campground fee actually. Quite often owners would happily let me take a couple gallons.
Not so sure on that practice with the high cost and proliferation of locking caps.
 
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Hello everyone...the stock fuel tank capacity of GS310 is incapable doing of long distance touring...has anyone changed or tried to increase the tank size or if there is any other options? please let me know...cheers!
Given the current absence of any aftermarket larger capacity fuel tanks for the G 310 GS, I‘ve been using the 1 US gallon (3.8 litre) Rotopax gas can (1 Gallon Gasoline) and have never needed more fuel capacity even on long off-road ADV rides with a full pannier set and tank bag load. I mount the Rotopax can on a Rally-Raid rear rack plate (G310GS Rear Rack Plate-RRP 850) - and there are plenty of other mounting options you could choose from depending on your preferred bike setup. However I have rarely needed to use the fuel pack to get myself to a refuelling station, using it more often to get others on bigger bikes with larger capacity fuel tanks out of trouble 🙄
 

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The Armadillo bag folks are having a sale on the soft gas bags. Google em. Like half off.
 

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Anyone using a small electric pump and a hose? Unless we ride in the middle of nowhere we'll find other riders or car drivers who may be willing to give us some fuel. With such pump it would take literally 2 minutes to transfer the fuel into the G 310 GS's small tank.
 

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Anyone using a small electric pump and a hose? Unless we ride in the middle of nowhere we'll find other riders or car drivers who may be willing to give us some fuel. With such pump it would take literally 2 minutes to transfer the fuel into the G 310 GS's small tank.
I always carry a 1 m piece of plastic hose, when adventure travelling. With that and a PET-bottle, it's easy to siphon fuel to give (or get) to somebody in need. I drop most of the hose in to the donor's tank, block the free end, lower the free end below level in the donor tank, insert the free end into the bottle and unblock the free end et voi la! So far I've yet to be on the receiving end of the operation.
 

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Anyone using a small electric pump and a hose? Unless we ride in the middle of nowhere we'll find other riders or car drivers who may be willing to give us some fuel. With such pump it would take literally 2 minutes to transfer the fuel into the G 310 GS's small tank.
Small clear (hopefully) line. Couple sucks on the line... you can see the gas coming down the line (again hopefully).
I've had gasoline in my mouth more than once. Otherwise... get one of these.

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Small clear (hopefully) line. Couple sucks on the line... you can see the gas coming down the line (again hopefully).
I've had gasoline in my mouth more than once. Otherwise... get one of these.

View attachment 18133
With my above described method (siphoning) you don't need to bee a gasoline head mouth. Only make sure the hose isn't too wide.
 

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Another option is the safety siphon type where you just insert the small brass pump end and vigorously move it in an up and down motion. I have the 10 foot version because I was thinking I would want to transfer from a car or truck to the motorcycle. However, because the motorcycle gas tank is almost always higher than a car or truck, that will not work. The better way is to siphon into a bottle sitting on the ground and then pour it into the motorcycle. For that, their shorter versions would suffice and be easier to pack.


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In the Stone Age we called a siphon hose a “credit card”…….with the newer Viton hoses a hose can double as spare fuel line. With the newer fuel bags, pretty easy to stash a hose in pocket. An electric pump would allow for direct transfer of fuel to motorbike without a vessel.
 

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It wouldn’t be that hard to plumb into the fuel injection system and use that pump to transfer fuel. Not entirely sure it would be worth it but it’s possible. Perhaps if you carry a spare fuel pump then something could be rigged?
 

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Why use something that requires any kind of power source, when you have the greatest force on earth to do the job? The force I'm referring to is called gravity. Once you have inserted most of the meter of hose in the donor tank and plugged the free end with a finger (I use my thumb), you just lower the free end below the surface of the liquid in the tank and gravity takes car of the rest. I avoid carrying any extra equipment that needs a power source that can brake, when I travel. You will however need a bottle, but those people throw away almost everywhere, except here in Finland. But to everyone according to his/hers/it's/undefined genders needs.
 

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Else something like a feed line for a powerboat. No power required...

(I do not fancy siphoning fuel with my mouth... thus either some electric or mechanical pump)
That would probably work fine, but I don't use my mouth and the rubber bladder is a waste of space and a possible source for malfunction. Most rubbers do not like benzine/petrol/essance/gasoline/gas/petroleum, hence forward called fuel. That bladder may, or may not be suitable for it's purpose.
My method is based on the laws of physics. When I insert the hose in the tank, the fuel will fill up most of the hose. When I block the free end of the hose and lift it up from the tank opening, the hose will be filled with fuel in almost all its length. When I lower the (now blocked) free end of the hose to a position below the surface of the fuel in the tank, the force of gravity will pull the fuel from the tank when the free end ins un-blocked. No need for getting fuel in the mouth or using any pump or one-way valve. No parts can brake and no need for a power source.
As they say: Keep it simple, stupid!
 
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