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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Guys,

Recently I am attending riding courses on a G310R 2020, and I am wondering whether it's a good idea to perform the slalom (13ft each cone) & figure 8 with:

1- The idle speed (clutch fully released)
or
2- Use the friction zone + the rear brake

I am a newbie for me the 1st option sounds good but I am doing a lot of effort to lean the bike right & left... and the moto is accelerating by itself sometimes without any throttle action (I dont know why)

Thank you in advance for your advices

Best regards
 

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If you are attending the course, ask the instructors, they are there to instruct.
Knowing the characteristics of the G310 engine and its clutch, I would recommend using the friction zone and control your speed with the rear brake. If you use the friction zone, you can more or less stand still with the bike and the engine will still be running. This is good balance training. With clutch fully gripping, the engine stalls when the bike comes to a halt.
The reason for the bike wanting to accelerate is due to its idle setting. The controlling electronics senses when the engine is idling to low and wants to add speed to avoid stalling.
But don't take my word as the truth, ask the instructors.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you are attending the course, ask the instructors, they are there to instruct.
Knowing the characteristics of the G310 engine and its clutch, I would recommend using the friction zone and control your speed with the rear brake. If you use the friction zone, you can more or less stand still with the bike and the engine will still be running. This is good balance training. With clutch fully gripping, the engine stalls when the bike comes to a halt.
The reason for the bike wanting to accelerate is due to its idle setting. The controlling electronics senses when the engine is idling to low and wants to add speed to avoid stalling.
But don't take my word as the truth, ask the instructors.
Thank you for this feedback, regarding the instructor opinion: he tries to convince me that the good solution is to run with idle speed (6mph) clutch fully released (no brakes, no throttle, no clutch) just let the bike go and perform the slalom, when I tried that: the g310 struggles to take tight turns ~ 6,5 ft with 6mph

I will try the second option as you described and let you know ;) many thanks bro
 

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I did a slow riding course [some years ago] and we were instructed [as hassleman]
to slip the clutch and use the rear brake.
Even these days an empty car park is great fun doing figure of 8 ,slalom, tight U turns.etc.
 

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I was also taught to slip the clutch. I put myself trough slow speed training every spring to help me get my wheels back, and that's the way I do it.

As an added advantage, I find my clutch friction point has become more flexible, as I do not have as much complaint as most riders on this forum regarding the clutch.

YMMV ;)
 

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Yep, did my motorcycle course some years back, advice was slip the clutch (motorcycles are built for it unlike cars)

I'm not sure the G310R is the easiest bike for it as others have commented but doable
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I did a slow riding course [some years ago] and we were instructed [as hassleman]
to slip the clutch and use the rear brake.
Even these days an empty car park is great fun doing figure of 8 ,slalom, tight U turns.etc.

Thank you Raziel
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was also taught to slip the clutch. I put myself trough slow speed training every spring to help me get my wheels back, and that's the way I do it.

As an added advantage, I find my clutch friction point has become more flexible, as I do not have as much complaint as most riders on this forum regarding the clutch.

YMMV ;)

I will try that ;) it's an easy machine to stall in my opinion I should get used with the friction zone..
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yep, did my motorcycle course some years back, advice was slip the clutch (motorcycles are built for it unlike cars)

I'm not sure the G310R is the easiest bike for it as others have commented but doable
Yes it's not easy (especially for a new rider) I hope that I will overcame this challenge
 

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In the country I live, Finland, we have some driving school instructors without basic knowledge about driving a motorcycle but who are certified to instruct prospective motorcyclists. Luckily they are in minority. Due to lack of experience in motorcycle riding, their teaching is sometimes not with the best of standards. Their aim is to tech the their pupils how to pass the exam, not how to survive and become a skilful rider.
I used to be an instructor for motorcyclists who already had their license. As we have have a winter season when most bikers take a break in riding, many of them take a course in the beginning of the summer season to brush up their skills. I used to tech at such courses and also on courses for dirt road riding. Our aim was to teach our students how to really drive a motorcycle and how to survive in a hostile traffic environment.
It's all up to you to judge what advice to listen to. My opinion is that there is only one way to learn to become a good motorcyclist, that is by riding a motorcycle. The more you ride, the more you learn. And to stay safe, you have to accept that you are invisible and assume that everybody in the traffic around you makes mistakes and nobody obeys the traffic rules. The car that has to give way at the cross road, will not do it. If he did this time, it was just luck. Every time you drive on a green light, be sure somebody crosses your path against red, if not, this time you were lucky. Stay safe, ride defensively.
 

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In the country I live, Finland, we have some driving school instructors without basic knowledge about driving a motorcycle but who are certified to instruct prospective motorcyclists. Luckily they are in minority. Due to lack of experience in motorcycle riding, their teaching is sometimes not with the best of standards. Their aim is to tech the their pupils how to pass the exam, not how to survive and become a skilful rider.
I used to be an instructor for motorcyclists who already had their license. As we have have a winter season when most bikers take a break in riding, many of them take a course in the beginning of the summer season to brush up their skills. I used to tech at such courses and also on courses for dirt road riding. Our aim was to teach our students how to really drive a motorcycle and how to survive in a hostile traffic environment.
It's all up to you to judge what advice to listen to. My opinion is that there is only one way to learn to become a good motorcyclist, that is by riding a motorcycle. The more you ride, the more you learn. And to stay safe, you have to accept that you are invisible and assume that everybody in the traffic around you makes mistakes and nobody obeys the traffic rules. The car that has to give way at the cross road, will not do it. If he did this time, it was just luck. Every time you drive on a green light, be sure somebody crosses your path against red, if not, this time you were lucky. Stay safe, ride defensively.
So there are pieces I completely agree with, and pieces I don't in your response

  • Driving school is to help people pass tests, completely agree
  • Accept you are invisible and assume everyone makes mistakes and nobody obeys traffic laws, best advice ever (you could even say assume cars are actively trying to kill you)
  • The way to become a good motorcyclist is by riding more? I'm not sure I agree, yes experience will help you with basic skills, comfort on bike, some judgement, but I've seen tons of very experienced bikers with just outright bad habits and poor skills.

To be a better motorcyclist you need to work on it (not just ride), practice certain skills (emergency braking, swerving, low speed manoeuvres, etc. Things that you could ride for months and not do much of. Practice, professional coaching (good coaching) and just having someone observe you can be way more impactful than just bike time.
 

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So there are pieces I completely agree with, and pieces I don't in your response

  • Driving school is to help people pass tests, completely agree
  • Accept you are invisible and assume everyone makes mistakes and nobody obeys traffic laws, best advice ever (you could even say assume cars are actively trying to kill you)
  • The way to become a good motorcyclist is by riding more? I'm not sure I agree, yes experience will help you with basic skills, comfort on bike, some judgement, but I've seen tons of very experienced bikers with just outright bad habits and poor skills.

To be a better motorcyclist you need to work on it (not just ride), practice certain skills (emergency braking, swerving, low speed manoeuvres, etc. Things that you could ride for months and not do much of. Practice, professional coaching (good coaching) and just having someone observe you can be way more impactful than just bike time.
Well, I didn't say it was exclusively by riding. Don't you agree that without riding a motorcycle, you will never get the skills necessary to become a skilled motorcyclist? If you still disagree, please let me know the alternative ways of learning to ride and drive a motorcycle skilfully.
I do agree there are lots of bikers with lots of years and long mileages who never really learnt the art of riding and driving a motorcycle. I've seen some at the courses I instructed on. Those who attend courses are those who are willing to learn and improve.
The BMW G310 is, in my opinion a good bike to learn on. The difficulties some riders have with the clutch and stalling could be used to learn skills useful on "easier" bikes later on. Still the G310's are light weight enough to pick up when laid down than for instance the R1200, DAHIK ;)
 

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Well, I didn't say it was exclusively by riding. Don't you agree that without riding a motorcycle, you will never get the skills necessary to become a skilled motorcyclist? If you still disagree, please let me know the alternative ways of learning to ride and drive a motorcycle skilfully.
I do agree there are lots of bikers with lots of years and long mileages who never really learnt the art of riding and driving a motorcycle. I've seen some at the courses I instructed on. Those who attend courses are those who are willing to learn and improve.
The BMW G310 is, in my opinion a good bike to learn on. The difficulties some riders have with the clutch and stalling could be used to learn skills useful on "easier" bikes later on. Still the G310's are light weight enough to pick up when laid down than for instance the R1200, DAHIK ;)
Don't disagree on that part, nothing beats time in saddle (riding) so that most things become second nature

But you have to work on being a better rider, however you do it, it needs to be a goal, you could ride for 30 years and still be absolute rubbish at emergency breaking (do you ever really practice that in "normal" riding?)

Summary = it takes both, ride a lot and work at being a better rider (solo practice or courses, whatever)
 

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Don't disagree on that part, nothing beats time in saddle (riding) so that most things become second nature

But you have to work on being a better rider, however you do it, it needs to be a goal, you could ride for 30 years and still be absolute rubbish at emergency breaking (do you ever really practice that in "normal" riding?)

Summary = it takes both, ride a lot and work at being a better rider (solo practice or courses, whatever)
It seems that we are in complete agreement :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
In the country I live, Finland, we have some driving school instructors without basic knowledge about driving a motorcycle but who are certified to instruct prospective motorcyclists. Luckily they are in minority. Due to lack of experience in motorcycle riding, their teaching is sometimes not with the best of standards. Their aim is to tech the their pupils how to pass the exam, not how to survive and become a skilful rider.
I used to be an instructor for motorcyclists who already had their license. As we have have a winter season when most bikers take a break in riding, many of them take a course in the beginning of the summer season to brush up their skills. I used to tech at such courses and also on courses for dirt road riding. Our aim was to teach our students how to really drive a motorcycle and how to survive in a hostile traffic environment.
It's all up to you to judge what advice to listen to. My opinion is that there is only one way to learn to become a good motorcyclist, that is by riding a motorcycle. The more you ride, the more you learn. And to stay safe, you have to accept that you are invisible and assume that everybody in the traffic around you makes mistakes and nobody obeys the traffic rules. The car that has to give way at the cross road, will not do it. If he did this time, it was just luck. Every time you drive on a green light, be sure somebody crosses your path against red, if not, this time you were lucky. Stay safe, ride defensively.
Hope all instructors performing as you do Hasselman thanks for your advices !
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So there are pieces I completely agree with, and pieces I don't in your response

  • Driving school is to help people pass tests, completely agree
  • Accept you are invisible and assume everyone makes mistakes and nobody obeys traffic laws, best advice ever (you could even say assume cars are actively trying to kill you)
  • The way to become a good motorcyclist is by riding more? I'm not sure I agree, yes experience will help you with basic skills, comfort on bike, some judgement, but I've seen tons of very experienced bikers with just outright bad habits and poor skills.

To be a better motorcyclist you need to work on it (not just ride), practice certain skills (emergency braking, swerving, low speed manoeuvres, etc. Things that you could ride for months and not do much of. Practice, professional coaching (good coaching) and just having someone observe you can be way more impactful than just bike time.
Well said !
 

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I redid my basic course in November. They had 310R there I used. Thing was smooth in all the slow stuff but only if you slip the clutch. Like you said it jerks otherwise…<
 
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