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Discussion Starter #1
Nothing to do with the G310,but i keep seeing references to the G310,being BMW's first under 500cc road bike(magazines etc)but i'm sure a mate of mine had a 450R?,back in the 70's,of course i could be wrong again & the 450R was actually over 500cc,anyone know?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sorry it was a R450,I don't know how to cop links properly,but i think if you copy & paste the following,it may work.
Edit i think it just works if you click on ir
1980 BMW R450
 

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Most people, including publications, may not remember older models like the 1980 BMW R450 or they could have been born after its time. I definitely didn't know about it until now.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Most people, including publications, may not remember older models like the 1980 BMW R450 or they could have been born after its time. I definitely didn't know about it until now.
Well,lets see,that's 37years old,i'm quite a bit more than double that age & there are quite a few of us oldies around,the ploiticians are moaning about us bankrupting the NHS,all the time:grin2:
But seriously some of the publications i've read this "fact" stated in,should know better,Research?.
I know it's not important but sometimes it's nice proving some of these smart a**e reporters wrong:grin2:
 

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You'd be surprised at the amount of times these "journalists" will report wrong information. Either one, they've read it somewhere else and they just re-state it, or two, they don't know better because they haven't seen anything recently and go based off of that instead of doing the appropriate research.

It does feel good to know that you know they're wrong haha!
 

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And this is why forums are so great. We have a variety of riders to learn from or bounce ideas off of instead of just taking publications as fact. :grin2: That 1980 BMW R450 looks like it was one amazing cruiser for long cross country rides. But mad does that engine look heavy.
 

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Isn't cm3 to cc one to one? Both stands for cubic centimeters as far as I know and measure the volume of the cylinders in a motorcycle's engine. What are you trying to convert?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Not sure if you mean me or SlickRick,i think the the R450,signified around 450cc,like the R650 was around 650cc.
I still don't know what cm3 means.
 

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Lol I think @SlickRick may have head a little lapse in thought probably based off of cm3 (cubic centimeter) being represented differently from cc (cubic centimeter) and thought a conversion was needed.
 

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cm is centimeter, 3 is cube, so cubic centimeter, same as cc.
Everyone seems to forget the R27, 250cc single BMW's of the '50's and '60's, I believe last built in about 1967.
 

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Ah..Yes,
BMW produced many quarter liter singles from 1925 up to 1967... One model, the R2 for 1931 to 1936 depression years was a 200 but many 250cc bikes were made other years. I am not sure about WWII years. The 250cc displacement was 247 cc from the factory so that one could do a couple of clean up cylinder borings for replacing piston rings without exceeding the 250cc license limit. Annual license taxes were based on displacement.

Here are some model numbers for your personal research;

R39 1925-1927
R2 1931-1936 200cc
R20 1938-1940
R23 1938-1940
R24 1948-1950
R25 1951-1956
R26 1956-1962
R27 1962-1967 Rubber Engine Mounts

BMW R27

BMW R26 - CycleChaos

The R27 would have been a superb machine if they had gear driven counterbalancers at that time. The rubber block engine mounts helped but it still had a pretty tedious vibration at speed compared to the wonderful twins.




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I bought my first BMW R65 in 1979.
This was BMW first new small bike.
At the same time they introduced the R45.

The engines were similar with the bigger R75 / R90 and R100 engines.
The difference was the power.
I know my R65 (650 cc) had about 45 horsepower.
Can’t remember how many hp / cc the R45 had.

Advantage was the fact you could change parts quite easy.
My second Beamer was a new R65 after I had the old one for 3 years and almost 100.000 km’s

Since then I drove various BMW models and now back to this small 😉 BMW G310R.
 

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WillyR50S,
During wwII bmw made a lot of 750’s with a sidecar and machine gun mounted.
Even zundapp made a 750 with sidecar called the ‘green elephant’.
This zundapp was the base for the ELEPHANTENTREFF, a winter meeting for motorcyclist in the snow.
They started at the Nurburgring, but move towards Austria.
It is still a rally (TREFF) were a lot of, mostly sidecar riders, meet.
 

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There is no information on the internet about whether BMW made a single cylinder machine for the Wehrmacht. I suspect that all of their efforts were then tied up in supplying the twin R75 and making parts for the general military procurement initiative. At that time many companies were involved with making parts for other types of equipment based on their manufacturing capacity and manufacturing expertise. For example BMW might have been making aluminum castings for Opel truck radio mounts. The war initiative required that all companies join in in maximizing production.

Bikes of the Blitzkrieg

The point of my earlier post yesterday was to show that the G310 was hardly BMW's first foray into making sub 500cc machines. A lot of motor journalists have not done their home work and they continue to spout the falsehood that the G310 is the first ever single cylinder sub 500 cc machine produced by the marque in their long manufacturing history since 1921.


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I don't know if the Germans used one cylinder BMW's during the war.
I only know they used 750 BMW's and Zundapp's

And yes, you are right, BMW made smaller bikes before (250's)
 

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I learned to ride on a Harley 125 (DKW RT125 copy) and Hercules K100's (JBeK 100 in the US). Then graduated to a 1956 R50 that belonged to a friend. I never had enough money to buy one but that was such an amazing machine with the Earles fork front suspension that would soak up potholes with no competition in sight. Eventually gained employment at a BMW shop as a mechanic and still could not afford one as $1200 in 1965 was a small fortune to a young lad... Oh!, the opposed twin was so smooth. Much smoother than the R27 single... It brings back wonderful memories of the early 1960's. My forum name was inspired by those days.
 
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