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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My new 310r is only 200kms old and is due its first service in 2 weeks. when I try to rev it around 5k + rpm (under 6-7k) I feel the engine taking too much strain as if its asking for an upshift. this kinda bugs me as on YouTube riding reviews I see people with g310r usually driving around 8k rpm.

Also, due to this, its demanding faster gear shifts in city traffic than id prefer. 3rd to 4th gear is too fast then usually I have to slow down and alas downshift again.

do things get exceptionally better after first service? or does my riding experience /style is lacking something? somewhat newbie here to biking (and this is my first bike so apologies in advance if I sound like an idiot or something馃槄)
 

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There are 2 ways to generate power with an internal combustion engine:
1- Big cylinders (or lots of CC) revving slowly.
2- Small cylinders (or less CC) revving like mad.

Guess what category our 313cc puts us in.....(Hint, not a Harley)

A search with this: bmw g310e power curve dyno will show you that at 6k rpm our motor is barely making 20 hp, but is close to its whopping maximum 19 NM of torque.

Also remember this is the same motor as the TVS Apache RR 310. So yeah once your 1000km is over (and even before for short periods) you can let her rip.
 

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I own the GS and I read in my user manual that I should not rev beyond 6k for the first 600Kms or so. Then I should not rev the engine beyond 7k for upto 1000Kms. I am a bit hazy on the kms but my point is, it has that info there in the user manual, and I stuck to it. I suggest you go through the user manual and stick to the figures mentioned there until your first servicing is done. Then you can slowly go about lighting up snowflakes once you get comfortable with the revs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I own the GS and I read in my user manual that I should not rev beyond 6k for the first 600Kms or so. Then I should not rev the engine beyond 7k for upto 1000Kms. I am a bit hazy on the kms but my point is, it has that info there in the user manual, and I stuck to it. I suggest you go through the user manual and stick to the figures mentioned there until your first servicing is done. Then you can slowly go about lighting up snowflakes once you get comfortable with the revs.

your rev range got better after first service? did you notice significant difference in smoothness /acceleration/gear shifting?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I did notice some improvement but I have only been riding in city traffic ever since my first service was complete. I will be able to confirm once I go on a longer ride on open roads.
Can I ask at what kmph and rpm do you feel your engine is asking for an upshift? from 3rd to 4th gear and 4th to 5th

because for me, soon as i cross 35kmph and approx 4-5k rpm my engine does the straining sound. is this a breakin engine scenario which would get better after service or is this the nature of sports bike? i have only ridden cruisers before this and in those, the 2nd and 3rd gear could easily go till 60kmph. i dont expect that in my 310r but atleast i could get 45kmph in 3rd gear without any strains? sometimes i dont want to upshift downshift soo frequently.
 

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Can I ask at what kmph and rpm do you feel your engine is asking for an upshift? from 3rd to 4th gear and 4th to 5th

because for me, soon as i cross 35kmph and approx 4-5k rpm my engine does the straining sound. is this a breakin engine scenario which would get better after service or is this the nature of sports bike? i have only ridden cruisers before this and in those, the 2nd and 3rd gear could easily go till 60kmph. i dont expect that in my 310r but atleast i could get 45kmph in 3rd gear without any strains? sometimes i dont want to upshift downshift soo frequently.
I have not noticed at what speeds and rpm the engine asks for an upshift so I am unable to give you that info. However, I think that the engine is fine and it is just you who are not used to riding at higher rpms. I say this because, I too bought my GS after riding an Enfield and I did notice the same things like you described. I think to some extent I am still getting used to revving harder. The engine does start sounding different once you cross 4k rpm, but that is not something to be scared of. This engine is designed to be revved and post 4k, the sound that it makes is not of it straining, but that's the sound it makes when it comes to life! Trust the process and the engine and just rev it. If anything fails, you have your warranty to back you up so don't worry and just enjoy the ride.

But yes, I would still suggest you to keep it under 6k for the first 600kms blah blah blah that is mentioned in the user manual until your first service is complete. Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have not noticed at what speeds and rpm the engine asks for an upshift so I am unable to give you that info. However, I think that the engine is fine and it is just you who are not used to riding at higher rpms. I say this because, I too bought my GS after riding an Enfield and I did notice the same things like you described. I think to some extent I am still getting used to revving harder. The engine does start sounding different once you cross 4k rpm, but that is not something to be scared of. This engine is designed to be revved and post 4k, the sound that it makes is not of it straining, but that's the sound it makes when it comes to life! Trust the process and the engine and just rev it. If anything fails, you have your warranty to back you up so don't worry and just enjoy the ride.

But yes, I would still suggest you to keep it under 6k for the first 600kms blah blah blah that is mentioned in the user manual until your first service is complete. Cheers!
Yep! thanks!

stupid question : does it ever get cruiser feel? i mean I just want to not constantly upshift downshift sometimes I just want to ride till 50kmph in 3rd gear, do you get that confidence in our 310 engines? shifting after every 10kmph increase is what that's bothering me, not really rpm related just the speed at which i have to constantly upshift downshift. engine doest feel smooth if im in 3rd or 4th gear and i dont upshift after 35kmph or 45kmph respectively that's what Im saying. I even showed it to a rider friend of mine and he agrees that i shouldn't strain the engine, i showed him what strain i was talking about. so does that strain goes away after first service?
sorry if im asking the same question again and again. just that i was pretty disappointed yesterday that did I buy a wrong bike as per my style or something lol hopefully thats not the case... i absolutely love the ride quality
 

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It鈥檚 never going to be smooth. I also have an RT and that engine is smooth. I鈥檝e done over 300 mile days on my 310 but it vibrates the whole time. There are certain engine speeds that are acceptable. I installed a smaller front chain sprocket to let the bike wind up easier. After 11,000 miles I like my 310 a lot.
If you want smooth this is the wrong bike.
 

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Yep! thanks!

stupid question : does it ever get cruiser feel? i mean I just want to not constantly upshift downshift sometimes I just want to ride till 50kmph in 3rd gear, do you get that confidence in our 310 engines? shifting after every 10kmph increase is what that's bothering me, not really rpm related just the speed at which i have to constantly upshift downshift. engine doest feel smooth if im in 3rd or 4th gear and i dont upshift after 35kmph or 45kmph respectively that's what Im saying. I even showed it to a rider friend of mine and he agrees that i shouldn't strain the engine, i showed him what strain i was talking about. so does that strain goes away after first service?
sorry if im asking the same question again and again. just that i was pretty disappointed yesterday that did I buy a wrong bike as per my style or something lol hopefully thats not the case... i absolutely love the ride quality
I am sorry to say but the engine is going to remain the same and things are not going to change dramatically after the first service. This is a hard revving engine and if you want to remain in 3rd gear while doing 50kmph, then you'll be revving the engine past 4-5k rpm and that is when you will feel that the engine is getting strained, which in reality it is not cuz it does come alive at that rpm. But I know what you mean so I would say that you just need to get used to this engine characteristics. From my experience, you will be able to do 30kmph in 3rd gear at roughly 3k rpm and that is when you will feel that the engine is relaxed. Go beyond 3k rpm and you will feel that the engine is stressed. Again, perhaps you feel like that cuz you're used to riding a more relaxed engine.
 

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The 310 is a small relatively high performance engine, it needs revs to make significant power. If you want a bike that makes enough power to cruise easily at low revs then you need to at least double the capacity to 650cc or more. Sorry, it seems that you bought the wrong bike.
 

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Hi,
As a rider for over 20 years, I think that you already have 2 very good replies:

There are 2 ways to generate power with an internal combustion engine:
1- Big cylinders (or lots of CC) revving slowly.
2- Small cylinders (or less CC) revving like mad.

Guess what category our 313cc puts us in.....(Hint, not a Harley)

A search with this: bmw g310e power curve dyno will show you that at 6k rpm our motor is barely making 20 hp, but is close to its whopping maximum 19 NM of torque.

Also remember this is the same motor as the TVS Apache RR 310. So yeah once your 1000km is over (and even before for short periods) you can let her rip.
I am sorry to say but the engine is going to remain the same and things are not going to change dramatically after the first service. This is a hard revving engine and if you want to remain in 3rd gear while doing 50kmph, then you'll be revving the engine past 4-5k rpm and that is when you will feel that the engine is getting strained, which in reality it is not cuz it does come alive at that rpm. But I know what you mean so I would say that you just need to get used to this engine characteristics. From my experience, you will be able to do 30kmph in 3rd gear at roughly 3k rpm and that is when you will feel that the engine is relaxed. Go beyond 3k rpm and you will feel that the engine is stressed. Again, perhaps you feel like that cuz you're used to riding a more relaxed engine.
But maybe I can still contribute something, since you state that you are a new rider, and there is a bit more to the total picture.
1) Running in
You should run the bike in, as specified in the manual.
This will extend the life of the motor, but will have little effect on it's overall feel. ( I actually did 1,000 miles, not just the specified 750 )
2) This bike is a single cylinder.
This format is inherently unbalanced, since there is only the weight of a single piston being thrown up and down inside the motor- up, stop, down, stop, back up.
Even with balancing weights on the crank to counteract the forces created, it will never be as smooth as an inline twin cylinder, or triple, or the most balanced of all inlines, a
four. In these formats the pistons are timed to rotate in an order to help smooth out vibration by counteracting the weight of one piston with the weight of another.
Other options, like BMW's famous 'Boxer' twin engine have 2 'opposing' cylinders. One cylinder comes out of one side of the engine, and the other on the other side.
The weight of one piston is counteracted by the opposing piston on the other side- Inherently smoother than all the above.
3) High revving engines
As the quote above, with modern lubricants and technology, engines are designed to rev high. It's not a problem !
So, I really think the concept of 'strain' at only halfway through the rev. band is misleading.
The bike is NOT 'straining', it is vibrating ( sure ), and getting nearer to the higher level of power output ( 'coming on cam' ),
That's not doing the bike any harm at all. In fact, it's exhibiting both the designed performance ( more power at higher rev.s ) and the limitations of the motor's format. ( single
cylinder at faster revolutions = more vibration )
I grew up riding 2 stroke 'screamers', which were all about maximum BHP in very narrow power bands at the very top of the rev. range.
That simply meant high rev.s or zero power. Check out reviews of the Kawasaki Mach III H1 from the 70's for the most extreme illustration: 2 choices- power off, power on !
The red line is your guide for the limits of the engine, and as a fail-safe, there is an automatic rev. limiter which just cuts the engine if you go over it.
But that says nothing about your comfort !
If you don't like the feel of the high rev.s, you'll learn how to avoid them.
4) Gears
Gears are primarily designed to maximise the power of the engine to obtain the highest speed possible.
Anyone using a pedal bike knows that to try to start off in top gear is near impossible.
Likewise, you cannot possibly pedal fast enough in a low gear to get to the same speed you can in top gear.
Now, transpose this to the motorcycle, thinking of what you asking your motor to do in each gear.
Now, question: Why do you want to 'cruise' in a low gear ? What are you trying to achieve ?
It seems to be a bit like looking through the wrong end of a telescope. You can do it, sure. But, why would you ?..
If you want the bike to feel 'lazy', choose a higher gear. Less rev.s, less vibration, but less power/slower reactions to the throttle.
Lower gear at the same speed means more rev.s, and it'll feel 'busy' !

I hope some of the above helps.
 
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