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I am slightly confused with Oil.
The handbook recommends SAE 15W-50, BMW Motorrad ADVANTEC Pro oil. Is this full or semi synthetic ?
What the difference between 10W - 40 and 15W-50 & 5W-30 etc etc.
10W-40 seems more readily available.
Secondly is there a alternative to the BMW Motorrad oil filters .
 

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Hey Tuke,

Stick with the manufacturer recommendations on the oil weights. The engineers determined those weights for a reason.

As for the difference, the first number deals with the viscosity of the oil when cold. So a 0W oil will be thinner than a 10W out of the bottle. The second number is the viscosity of the oil when at operating temperatures, typically at 180 to 200F. This indicates that at operating temperatures, the oil would not be thinner than the weight of the oil indicated.

For instance, a 10W-40 oil indicates that at operating temperatures, the oil would not be thinner than a 40 weight oil.

While a lighter (and thinner) oil enhances mileage and allows the engine to rev easier (theoretically), they may not provide the necessary viscosity to protect engine parts if the engine is made to run on heavier oil.

Lastly, BMW Advantec Pro oil is made by Shell with PurePlus technology. It is a synthetic oil.

Hope this helps!
 

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Can't help you on the filters, but recall there are prior threads on this topic and there are some alternatives I think mentioned (Ebay?). Me I stick to the BMW original stuff: oil and filter, for me not worth the few dollars to take a risk on alternatives. The BMW oil is semi-synthetic. I think so long as you stay with the viscosity and (API/JSO) performance ratings you should be ok.
 

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oil

Stick with a motorcycle oil , due to the bikes wet clutch.

A good semi synth , I did put 10/40 in mine but only did 80 miles , the bike went in for warranty work to have a water pump change and clutch cover , dealer dropped the oil and probably replaced it with 15-50.
But when it is due a change I will probably use 10/40 ( when BM went over to 15/50 and dropped Castrol we had 205 lts in stock for servicing BM R12's they said carry on using it.
 

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For the time my bike is under warranty I stick with manufacturer's recommendation, buying the oil and filter from my dealer. After initial service, oil changes are yearly or every 10,000km so it is not a huge expense. After warranty expires I might switch to another brand that meets the same specs.
Contradicting posts in this thread as to whether the BMW recommended oil for this bike is full or semi-synthetic: my findings shows it is SEMI-synthetic.
An example of how it is advertised here: https://www.shopbmwmotorcycle.com/c...w50-advantec-pro-semi-synthetic-engine-oil-1l

Oil change tutorial in case you need:
https://www.g310rforum.com/forum/305-service-maintenance/2729-tutorial-engine-oil-change.html
 

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It all depends on the ambient temperature. In cold weather, 10W50 or !0W40 is better. In hot climate, 15W... is better. I am always surprised, how people indiscriminately follow manufacturer's 'recommendations' like a holy bible without considering all the variables. In my Versus 1000 manual, at least Kawasaki says - 10W40 or 15W40/50 depending on the country. higher viscosity oil gives more protection, but is problematic with cold start, etc... The modern engines commonly call for lower viscosity, but at the end, one will be ok with any oil as long as it is good quality... The reason BMW insists on the particular oil is because they make money by selling it... I use Mobil1 10/40 in gs, as I ride it in high mountains during winter season.
 

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Kris, you might be surprised to know that manufacturers actually recommend different weight oils for different climates. And not following manufacturer recommendation within warranty period is a sure way of invalidating it. I am surprised at how many people just prefer to trust a manufacturer rather than internet.

As for the brand, as long as it meets the BMW standard, it does not matter. I prefer Penrite for all my vehicles and Penrite make oils meeting different standards.
 

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Kris, you might be surprised to know that manufacturers actually recommend different weight oils for different climates. And not following manufacturer recommendation within warranty period is a sure way of invalidating it. I am surprised at how many people just prefer to trust a manufacturer rather than internet.

As for the brand, as long as it meets the BMW standard, it does not matter. I prefer Penrite for all my vehicles and Penrite make oils meeting different standards.
oh, ok. from what I seen all the members here speak of the 15w50 as the only recommended oil for gs. and by bmw 'standard', what do you mean?
 

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The numbers represent viscosity index, or resistance to flow at a given temperature. The higher the number, the "thicker" the oil. Two numbers are given, the first is viscosity in (W)inter conditions (0°C or 32°F) and the second is viscosity in hot conditions (100°C or 212°F). The W viscosity is important when starting the engine in cold temperatures, and the hot viscosity describes oil performance at engine operating temperature.

BMW isn't in the business of making oil or filters, so they are probably marking up someone else's. If the marketing info is to be believed, the oil is made by Shell but I'm not sure about the filter. As for changing the oil viscosity, the manufacturer will usually specify viscosities in the manual based on the temperature the engine will be operating in, but BMW has no chart and specifies only 15W-50.

If the bike is under warranty, I would use BMW products. The engineers are making decisions based on dozens of competing factors that we will never fully understand. BMW offers 10W-40 oil but recommends it for water-cooled boxer engines. They recommend 15W-50 for single-cylinder engines. I'm sure they have their reasons, because it would be cheaper to specify one oil for everything. If you do decide to try something different, be sure to protect your wet clutch and use motorcycle oil and not automotive oil with friction modifiers.
 

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BMW calls for motorcycle engine oil to meet industry standards API SN, JASO MA2. Any oil in the correct weight/viscosity that is certified to this standard should be fine. API SM or API SL are okay as well.

Castrol used to be the supplier for BMW, but it's Shell that's got the contract.

For my Jeeps, they have their own specific standard Chrysler MS-6395. I have to use any oil that is certified to that standard. Make does not matter.
 

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BMW calls for motorcycle engine oil to meet industry standards API SN, JASO MA2. Any oil in the correct weight/viscosity that is certified to this standard should be fine. API SM or API SL are okay as well.

Castrol used to be the supplier for BMW, but it's Shell that's got the contract.

For my Jeeps, they have their own specific standard Chrysler MS-6395. I have to use any oil that is certified to that standard. Make does not matter.
I live in several countries, and my gs is in India. when a service man saw that my engine oil has different colour than the original one, he said my warranty could be voided! so stupid. some of the dealers just have no imagination. but i assume that BMW insists on using their Shell oil, so the dealer was instructed in this way.
 

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A warranty is a promise from a manufacturer/producer to take reponsability for sertain errors and faults in their products. As the manufacturer/producer is the one who has to pay for the rapair and/or correction of the deffects or faults covered by the warranty, it's the manufacturer/producer who makes the rules for how and when the warranty is valid. If a user is not willing to play by those rules, it's his/her own risk. It's is free for everybody to judge who is stupid, the manufacturer or the user. I for my self put my money on the manufacturer. At least as long as the warranty is valid.
 

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it is not matter of who is 'stupid'. most bike manufactures make deals with engine oil companies and then brand them as their own. kawasaski also has 'kawasaki' oil, even though obviously they do not manufacture it. Triumph requires using Castrol oil, because they made the same deal, even though in the past they had deal with Mobil company. Oil is oil as long as it is a good brand. There is not special magic to it. I change oil frequently and do not intend to pay for the service every time I do it. The first oil change I do is after 200km, because this is when the engine goes through the first stage of breaking in. Then I change oil every 1 or 2000km. I am certainly not going to wait for 10000km; oil the blood of the bike, and I like it clean. But every man for himself. Many of the manufacturer's recommendation are basic guidelines rather than absolutes that need to be followed religiously. However, in some more serious stuff, such as checking the valve clearance, etc., I would certainly follow the service manual.
 

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Maby I didn't say it simple enough: The manufacturer/producer gives the warranty. Therefor he makes the rules for the warranty. If you don't want to ply by the manufacturer's/producer's, don't expect him to play by those rules either.
You Kris are very quick to judge us other in this forum as "idiots" if/when we choose to play by the manufacturer's rules.
 

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Does your mechanic have a Superman type skill? I dare anybody who can tell make, grade and viscosity of the oil in the engine. Colour? When the oil was new or used? I know certain companies like Royal Purple use a dye for marketing purposes, but otherwise without proper chemical anaylsis it's impossible. So to avoid all that hassle, easiest way is to have the bike serviced by the dealer while under warranty.

As for living in different countries, you have no idea how many countries I have lived in and dealt with dealers. Do you? No. So it's irrelevant here.
 

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I think the problem is if you were a bike manufacturer, you wouldn't want people changing their own oil if you are providing a 3 year warranty. As a bike manufacturer, you wouldn't know if people were changing the oil properly (like Kris) or if they were using oil that could damage the diamond like coating on the cylinders.


In my opinion, there are so many problems that a dealer could pin on the use of inferior oil (whether or not that is the case) that it's not worthwhile changing your own oil during the warranty period. At the very least, I would buy the oil and filters from the dealer during the warranty period.


Also keep in mind that the oil is used in the gearbox (and clutch?).
 

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all the branded modern bike oils are suitable for gearbox and clutch. on the other hand, using car's oil in the bike would be wrong, as it will not contain friction modifiers for the clutch. i personally prefer to use synthetic oil, as it is of a higher quality, and it does not deteriorate that fast when the bike is stored for many months. mineral oil begin to brake down after 3 months, even if one is not riding the bike.

in the braking in period, mineral oil maybe a better option, as it is cheaper (and allegedly less slippery, allowing the piston rings to create the proper seal) which is an economical option when you change the oil more frequently.

i still have some vintage bikes, where the gearbox, main engine and clutch have separate compartments. this allows to use special gear oil for gearbox, and very thin oil for clutch. it is nice.
 

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Maby I didn't say it simple enough: The manufacturer/producer gives the warranty. Therefor he makes the rules for the warranty. If you don't want to ply by the manufacturer's/producer's, don't expect him to play by those rules either.
You Kris are very quick to judge us other in this forum as "idiots" if/when we choose to play by the manufacturer's rules.
I am rather civil is expressing my opinions. i never called anyone 'idiot', so you saying it is plain unfair and wrong.

from my experience in other forums, by calling someone names, you can get banned. it was you who used the term 'stupid' which is crude and highly inappropriate. i believe that the idea of this form is to be able to express one's opinions without being insulted by other members.
 

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Does your mechanic have a Superman type skill? I dare anybody who can tell make, grade and viscosity of the oil in the engine. Colour? When the oil was new or used? I know certain companies like Royal Purple use a dye for marketing purposes, but otherwise without proper chemical anaylsis it's impossible. So to avoid all that hassle, easiest way is to have the bike serviced by the dealer while under warranty.

As for living in different countries, you have no idea how many countries I have lived in and dealt with dealers. Do you? No. So it's irrelevant here.
I have 6 bikes in two countries, India and Thailand. No one gives damm in in Thailand, but in India the dealers (involved with foreign bikes) are extremely anal. It is what is funny about India. It is completely chaotic and unhygienic, but it is also extremely bureaucratic and without any imagination. they just love following 'rules'.

regarding the oil, the easy way to bypass the dealers claims, is to use the oil of the same colour. for instance, mobil1 has the same colour as the Shell used by bmw.

another issue: lets say that the bike fails. it can happen for all kind of reasons. if it fails because of the alternator, this is in specific category causing the bike to fail. and if you use different that recommended engine oil, or have aftermarket exhaust, this should not be in contradiction to the fact that the dealer is obliged to cover the electronic failures.
 
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