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Discussion Starter #1
Thought it would be nice to know how others ride their 310's or any other motorcycle for that matter.
Maybe some help for the newbies on, braking, cornering, accelerating, clutching, etc.

Are you a speedster, big leaner, slow and easy? Etc.

I will start it off with a simple and very effective method to smooth out cornering.
Brake early, so you are not braking in the turn, and accelerate midway through and power out
of the turn. Sounds so simple, but have ridden with many other riders, who don't use this technique and
lose the apex in the turns and don't have a smooth quick corner.:crying:

Let's hear some others!

Cheers
Rick
 

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Stay out of peoples blind spots, position yourself on the road where others can see you, coming up on a crossroad - position yourself (left or right of the lane) so that any cars coming out of the crossroad will see you earlier rather than too late. I also like to weave from side to side in the lane to make sure that approaching turning cars and cars in side streets see me (cars are more likely to see a weaving bike coming towards them than a bike traveling straight, it's just the way the eye works).


Always know that you have extra lean in reserve, i.e. don't hesitate and crash into a barrier, rather lean and ride through the turn (or at the very worst slide sideways into the barrier). Don't look at the barrier, always look where you want to go. Look at your tyres, those chicken fillets mean that you have an extra 30-40% lean when you really need it.


If you haven't done a riding course do one!
 

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As a beginner, I found it helpful to being able to master the clutch control, especially when coming out of alleys/vertical pathways and you need to make a hard right without being in danger of popping to the opposite traffic line. It may sound second nature but as you go up in motorcycle weight, it gets progressively harder to make sharp turns from a standstill. Personally, in terms of control, this video gave me the most gains and helped me immediately become better:

Another thing I found very useful since -again- I'm a beginner is that like the above said, it's very easy to underestimate how much lean you have left. Most of the time people brake mid-turn when they see that they can't pull through, but the trick is to accelerate and lean; and like porth stated earlier the worst case scenario is that you'll slide. This has saved me once where I misjudged a turn and I was lucky to not have instinctively pulled the brake lever.
 

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Having used a Kisan Headlight Modulator for many years I can say this is one of the best safety devices besides a helmet and maybe ABS. According to the Hurt Report, a car turning left in front of you in an intersection is one of the most common 2 vehicle accidents involving a motorcycle.

A headlight modulator makes them see you, they almost can't miss you, 4 flashes a second is hard to miss. You can see how effective on the freeway when cars move out of your way and on surface streets when they don't inch out of driveways.

An headlight modulator combines with a LOUD horn and bright helmets and clothing have kept me out of trouble for many years.

Check it out.
 

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On both bicycles and motorcycles I have found that if I mis-judge a turn, using the rear brake to bleed speed will get be back to where I need to be. The rear brake used "lightly" will not effect your steering.

Also and I learned this many years ago, a primary rule in riding motorcycles, PAY ATTENTION.
 

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"Always know that you have extra lean in reserve"

Yes, trust your equipment, with good tires you can lean your bike (counter steer) and get yourself out of trouble far more than you think.
 

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Two things worth mentioning, I think: 1) In many states (and countries) headlight modulators are illegal, and 2) don't depend on that extra lean angle when you’re riding on rain-slicked roads, like the kind we get here in Oregon during our annual rain festival (Jan. 1 – Dec. 31).
 

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I was stopped about 10 years ago by a Pasadena cop on Hwy. 210 because of my HLM and he wanted to give me a ticket.

I didn't have the DOT info on me and asked him if he wanted to go to court and look un-informed (like a fool) to the judge.

I made a deal that if he would hold on to the ticket I would fax him the info when I got home, which I did and no ticket.

In the many years since then I have not even had a look from LEO's but have had, twice, people tell me my headlight is broken. Thanks, the point is they notice me.

BTW- WoodWorks, I hear that is some beautiful country you live in, riding must be great!!!!!!!
 

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BTW- WoodWorks, I hear that is some beautiful country you live in, riding must be great!!!!!!!
Yup, it's not bad. You should ride up here sometime and check it out, Paul.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'll add another that has already been mentioned, but can't emphasize the importance. Yes the horn, not bad on the 310, but
I have ordered another Stebel air horn (my third now). On some of my older bikes, the horn was pretty much useless.
The Stebel gets attention NOW. Also as you are leaving for your ride, check it, make sure it works.
Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A few more of my pointers that I practice.
Keeping my head/eyes moving to be aware of my surroundings, and a way to escape a situation.
Gridlock is tough to do this in. I like to get out of the "platoon" of vehicles asap, so if I have to
speed up or slow down to do this, so be it.
Being visible, adding lights like Bikevis mini LED bullets is inexpensive and effective. Couple of extra
red running lights on the rear, and amber on the front make a noticeable difference.
Optic green/yellow jackets, vests, or helmets may not be fashionable but they work well too.
My rule of thumb on riding, when you put your helmet on, consider yourself invisible.
 

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Thought it would be nice to know how others ride their 310's or any other motorcycle for that matter.
Maybe some help for the newbies on, braking, cornering, accelerating, clutching, etc.

Are you a speedster, big leaner, slow and easy? Etc.

I will start it off with a simple and very effective method to smooth out cornering.
Brake early, so you are not braking in the turn, and accelerate midway through and power out
of the turn. Sounds so simple, but have ridden with many other riders, who don't use this technique and
lose the apex in the turns and don't have a smooth quick corner.:crying:

Let's hear some others!

Cheers
Rick
What i would suggest is, ALWAYS DRIVE DEFENSIVE. always think that the drivers around you havent seen you andif they did, they just dont care, :crying:
whenver i get on my bike, every other driver i see is out to get me, even pay attention to trucks that may be transporting stuff, and i also throw every now and then the falling tree or avalanche if the road has mountain on the side hehe.
also, i always check the rearview mirror of the other cars to see if i can see the face of the guy, this is useful when you are moving thru traffic as you can easily tell if the guy is looking for a way out or just haning there
 

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Don't get angry at drivers, most of the time they are decent people who would never want to harm you. If you get angry at them, you end up having a crash somewhere else because you got all worked up about the situation. Imagine that the other driver is your parent, partner, kid. Instead of getting angry, congratulate yourself that you were able to avoid a crash.
 

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Know and always ride below your limits. The only thing past 100 percent is 100 percent failure!
 

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Lots of good advice but remember, the most important safety issue is ‘YOU’
The Beamer does all the things you want (99%) so YOU should be safe and sound once YOU start riding.
No alcohol or drugs, good night of sleep and mentally and physically able to control the Beamer.
Good luck out there.
 
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