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Discussion Starter #1
I finally got to sit on a 310r. Part of the seat flares out so that when i sat on it, it was harder to get enough foot on the ground to feel comfortable. I know this may be a stupid question but are you supposed to sit in front of that wider part of the seat, more toward the tank?
I was also on the z400, which has the same seat height but I felt like I could touch the ground a little better because the seat doesn’t flare out like that.
 

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I have a Duke 390 and the same problem as you!
As the seat is also wider at the rear.

I just sit at the front of the seat, and then move back when l get going.
It soon becomes second nature to move forward as l come to a stop.

At first l thought l would need the lowering kit, as l can only get the balls of my feet down.
In fact l bought the KTM kit which cost around £260/$300

But again, after a while l got more confidence and began to just put one foot down.
Like the BMW, the KTM is so light weight (for a motorcycle) that putting only one foot down when l stop is not a problem.

I never fitted the lowering kit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am reluctant to install the lowering kit because if I ever went to sell, it might be an issue.
I was thinking about possibly having the seat shaved a little, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Do you mean, if I were to leave my right foot on the peg, could i get my left foot down? I think so. But can a new rider start out from a stop like that?
 

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Do you mean, if I were to leave my right foot on the peg, could i get my left foot down? I think so. But can a new rider start out from a stop like that?

A new rider should start out like that. Exactly like that.



Left foot on the ground.
Right foot on the peg with toe on the brake.
In first gear.
Clutch pulled in.
Eyes checking mirrors, escape route including between cars, cross traffic, traffic lights.
That way you are ready. Traffic light, leaving work, hill start, any situation.



Don't be caught two feet down, in neutral, looking in shop windows at how cool you look and getting rear ended by the car behind you while you frig about trying to get it into first gear on the green light.
 

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A new rider should start out like that. Exactly like that.


Left foot on the ground.
Right foot on the peg with toe on the brake.
In first gear.
Clutch pulled in.
Eyes checking mirrors, escape route including between cars, cross traffic, traffic lights.
That way you are ready. Traffic light, leaving work, hill start, any situation.


Don't be caught two feet down, in neutral, looking in shop windows at how cool you look and getting rear ended by the car behind you while you frig about trying to get it into first gear on the green light.
Yep, that's exactly what they try to drill into you during the motorcycle courses. Always be ready to go! I only change into neutral when turning off the bike, or when I want to put the side stand down and keep the engine running, or when I need to use both hands while pulled over.

I love the fact that BMW have made it hard to accidentally change to neutral when going from 1-2 or 2-1 :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Usually, though, they say that beginners should be able to have 2 feet on the ground. I was taught, in my course, left foot down first but nobody ever said to keep the right foot on the peg. Yes, they said to stay in 1st at stops.
 

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don't worry about these anal things that they teach on motocycle courses; it is for babies, not for real bikers. you can keep 2 feet on the ground and be happy. why to keep the right foot on the brake peg??? makes no sense. hold the brake with the hand brake lever, and be more stable on the ground.

if one is shorter, at least one should touch the ground with tip toes of the two feet, or else you can lose balance.
 

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don't worry about these anal things that they teach on motocycle courses; it is for babies, not for real bikers. you can keep 2 feet on the ground and be happy. why to keep the right foot on the brake peg??? makes no sense. hold the brake with the hand brake lever, and be more stable on the ground.

if one is shorter, at least one should touch the ground with tip toes of the two feet, or else you can lose balance.
You are not a "real biker". Sorry but please don't give bad advice.
- Using the front or the rear brake at a stop is a choice. There is no right or wrong way.
- Two feet on the ground or one at a stop is also a choice.
1. If I want to accelerate very quickly, my left foot on the peg ready to shift while the right foot is on the ground.
2. If I'm just relaxing, either boot feet on the ground or one....don't matter.
3. If I'm on an incline, foot on the brake is way better than finger on the front brake. If you disagree, you're an idiot.

To the original poster,
Get the Kawasaki Z400, it's way better because it is more powerful and comfortable.

both bikes, you can install the lowering link. I installed the lowering link on the G310R for my wife who is 5'1. I'm 5'5 and can ride fast with the lowering link no issues in the cayons. Don't listen to idiots about it's not good to lower the bike.
 

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Usually, though, they say that beginners should be able to have 2 feet on the ground. I was taught, in my course, left foot down first but nobody ever said to keep the right foot on the peg. Yes, they said to stay in 1st at stops.
I agree. Beginners need all the confidence they can get. Both feet on the ground will give you more confidence. Once you are no longer a beginner, it will no longer be an issue.

Practice SLOW speed turns and making circles! If you master slow speed, you will be more confident riding on the streets. Practice clutch control to the point that that it becomes instinctive! Remember that speed is controlled by both the throttle and the clutch! If you don't want to get killed, practice in your head to anticipate what other cars and riders around you will do ahead of time. Practice hard braking without locking the wheels. Practice locking the rear wheel. Always wear proper protective clothing.
 

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Usually, though, they say that beginners should be able to have 2 feet on the ground. I was taught, in my course, left foot down first but nobody ever said to keep the right foot on the peg. Yes, they said to stay in 1st at stops.

You don't need to have 2 feet on the ground. Riding with only 1 foot down is a very important skill - if you only ever ride bikes where you can get both feet down then you'll never learn the skills you need to ride bigger or taller bikes in the future, and even on this bike you'll have trouble with side hills or crowned roads where you can't always reach the ground with both feet.



My wife is 4'11" and rides a G310GS off road with the OEM low saddle but without a lowering link. She can reach the ground with her toes on one side, that's it. She's never owned a bike where she could reach the ground on both sides.
 

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When l purchased my KTM Duke 390 earlier this year, l had not ridden since 2007.

At first l was a little lacking in confidence so l ordered the lowering kit.

However after a few rides l realised that the bike is so easy to handle, and l was happy to just put one foot down when l stopped.

The bike is light weight and easy to catch if it starts to fall over.

I can just about get both toes down at the same time. If this was not possible l would probably have fitted the lowering kit anyway.

On my last bike back in 2007 l wasn’t so happy as it weighed over 200kg
But the Duke, like the BMW G310, is a lot lighter.
In fact it’s only 25-30% lighter but feels a lot easier to manage.
It’s a great bike for someone returning to riding or their first larger capacity machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
don't worry about these anal things that they teach on motocycle courses; it is for babies, not for real bikers. you can keep 2 feet on the ground and be happy. why to keep the right foot on the brake peg??? makes no sense. hold the brake with the hand brake lever, and be more stable on the ground.

if one is shorter, at least one should touch the ground with tip toes of the two feet, or else you can lose balance.
You are not a "real biker". Sorry but please don't give bad advice.
- Using the front or the rear brake at a stop is a choice. There is no right or wrong way.
- Two feet on the ground or one at a stop is also a choice.
1. If I want to accelerate very quickly, my left foot on the peg ready to shift while the right foot is on the ground.
2. If I'm just relaxing, either boot feet on the ground or one....don't matter.
3. If I'm on an incline, foot on the brake is way better than finger on the front brake. If you disagree, you're an idiot.

To the original poster,
Get the Kawasaki Z400, it's way better because it is more powerful and comfortable.

both bikes, you can install the lowering link. I installed the lowering link on the G310R for my wife who is 5'1. I'm 5'5 and can ride fast with the lowering link no issues in the cayons. Don't listen to idiots about it's not good to lower the bike.
If you prefer the z400, why is your wife still riding the Bmw? Did she sit on or ride the z400? What were her thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I agree with you there. I’m kind of in the same position. If I get the bmw, I’ll have to spend a significant amount of $, to be a to ride comfortably. However, the z400 costs more upfront, even used because the ones out there are 19s and the bmws are 18s. I can’y afford to buy new in either.
 

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Well, l am 5-6 and have no trouble riding the Duke which is very similar in height with the standard seat, to the BMW G310

If l were any shorter l’d want to lower the bike though, so l can see where you are coming from.
 
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