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That function is indeed one reason the slipper clutch is used. According to TVS website, there’s more going on as well. Much like the big boxers, there’s some clever engineering which combined with ECU makes it easier to start off and not stall motor. I‘ve been riding with a clutch since Stone Age much with a dry one. It took much effort for me to test this bit of engineering but by goodness it works! I don’t require it but it’s there. If this were my off road steed it would play in more. It does have a very light lever, right there with my Van Van’s not so techno clutch. Another “big feature” on a wee bike.
 

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anyway, i just got the new model. no disabling abs is here.
Actually, you can have ABS-on in front and ABS-disabled in the rear; read my last post (#40) at...

 

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That is some good stuff. Say what’s your move these days with the anti lock? Disable when off road? Does the ECU eventually learn and give a red light? Ignore? I’ve read of disabling the fuse but one loses other functions, quite like your description of disabling the sensor.
On the road, it’s the rear anti lock I feel going into action from time to time, I think saving me from locking up the rear with ineptness. I wouldn’t have much faith without ABS on rear on the road.
 

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That is some good stuff. Say what’s your move these days with the anti lock? Disable when off road? Does the ECU eventually learn and give a red light? Ignore? I’ve read of disabling the fuse but one loses other functions, quite like your description of disabling the sensor. On the road, it’s the rear anti lock I feel going into action from time to time, I think saving me from locking up the rear with ineptness. I wouldn’t have much faith without ABS on rear on the road.
Re my move: Originally, I intended to install a on/off switch for the rear ABS sensor; I even have the switch sitting on my bench. However, I didn't have time to install it before the 7,101 mile trip I completed three weeks ago, so I'm now used to having no rear ABS. Also, with the switch, I know I would forget to switch the ABS on and off a lot of the time, especially when doing a mix of on- and off-road and that could lead to a nasty situation if I was erroneously thinking it was on while on-road or thinking it was off while off-road. So I'm going to leave the rear ABS sensor disabled except when someone else will be riding the bike, e.g., when I turn it in to the dealer for servicing or let my nephew ride it while he's visiting. I don't want someone expecting ABS to be surprised by it's lack.

Re ECU learning/red light: You need to re-read my #40 post in the above ABS 2021 Model link. I'll summarize here. I disabled my rear ABS sensor by unbolting it, turning it so the sensor faces outward, and bolting it back on. As I start out, I get the usual 0 mph speedometer reading and the usual still trying-to-do-ABS-diagnostics flashing yellow for a few miles; while this is happening, my tests have determined that there is no ABS, front or rear. After those few miles, the flashing yellow goes and stays solid yellow; when this happens, my tests have determined that I have front ABS, but no rear ABS, just what I want for off road. This process repeats every time I turn the bike off via the key in the ignition switch; to avoid that for short stops, I instead use the engine kill switch to kill the engine. That said, please re-read the more detailed write-up in my #40 post in the above ABS 2021 Model link. Also, carefully do your own tests to convince yourself that I'm correct (or not).

Re pulling the fuse: I have not tried this because I would expect pulling the fuse to disable both front and rear ABS and that's not what I want. I would also expect pulling the fuse to stop everything that depends upon the ABS readings, e.g., your speedometer will not work and your odometer will no longer correctly show the number of miles on your bike (illegal in most places unless you declare as much when you sell the bike).

Re operating without rear ABS: I consider this the lesser risk among those considered for this decision. For me, (1) front ABS is critical to maintaining directional control both on- and off-road and must never lock up the front wheel; and (2) non-ABS rear brake is critical off-road when the front ABS is letting the front wheel rotate more or less freely because the surface is loose. Because of this, with rear ABS disabled full time, I have to remember that on this bike, old school non-ABS rules apply during rear wheel lock-ups, especially on pavement: If the rear wheel locks up, I must keep it locked up until full stop; otherwise, I could high side if the rear wheel starts rolling while the rear wheel is off-center from the rest of the bike. This is OK because if the rear wheel is locked up and the front wheel is rolling, I have directional control and, while the locked up rear wheel might disconcertingly move around some, it will follow the rolling front wheel. This is my risk assessment and decision based on how I expect to ride my 3GS. You have to do your own risk assessment and make your own decision based on how you expect to ride your 3GS.

Hope this clarifies and helps.
 

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I think your right on. I didn’t quite get the having to reset every time, i Do now. Thanks
I’ve become a little addicted to abs. I can push a little further than I meant to and get away with it, without hassle. I can also be sloppy and not pay. But that’s street. My dirt bike has no abs. My 1150GSA was dangerous off road with ABS operational. Based on your experience testing out disconnecting like you did would be smart. Pretty cool that the 310 can be an off road contender with a few modifications. And out the box a fine “GS” unless your a chunker like me.
 
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