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The other day I was out riding some forest roads. I was about 10 miles deep into the woods when a rock kicked up and hit my side stand switch. Bike died instantly. With no way to repair the switch I jumped it out. There are 3 wires on the switch. Basically join the blue/red and green/black wires. Leave the green/red wire alone. After doing this I was able to continue the ride with no warnings on the dash. Do this at your own risk as it’s now possible to ride off with the side stand down.

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thanks for sharing, I'll keep this in mind should I ever run into this problem.

Just remember to check if it is the stand switch, if the bike doesn't start in neutral, it's highly likely the stand switch is not the problem, or there may be additional problems.
 

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I believe it makes more sense to install a switch guard to prevent this type of incident!!! I have seen this sensor guard from SRC, not sure if this is high quality or not.
WARNING! Be very careful replacing the OEM sensor guard with a solid metal one.

If you look closely at the sensor switch assembly, it has a U-shape that wraps around the stationary post that comes through the middle of the sensor guard (OEM or the one below) and secures it with a circlip. As the side stand moves, the U-shape sensor moves up and down the base of the stationary post. In other words, the post is a critical component of the side stand switch sensor process.

I know this because, five days ago, with the solid metal sensor guard pictured below installed, I hit a rock and with the sensor guard being solid metal, it transferred the force to the middle post and bent the middle post out of position. With the middle post out of position, the sensor could no longer sense that the side stand was up and killed my engine.

I had to jump the same two wires the OP identified, but I didn't want to cut any wires. Instead, I unplugged the wiring harness plug from the sensor and inserted a piece of wire connecting the two right most holes when the plug is held with the rounded side on the right. I then used duct tape to tape this wire in position. With this fix in place, I was able to ride about 150 miles home, with 50 of the miles being on primitive roads.

If I been using the plastic OEM guard, the plastic would have broken rather than bending the middle post. I might have needed a new plastic guard rather than needing to bend post bent back into position or cut it off and weld it back in position.

My bottom line: Do not use a metal sensor guard that uses the middle post as a mounting point. Find one that fully protects the post (I've just started looking). Given that there is only one other mounting point, I'm not sure it's possible to create a metal sensor guard that can fully protect the switch and the middle post. If the sensor guard is mounted only on that one other mounting point and it takes a hit, the sensor guard will likely rotate around that one other mounting point and might damage the sensor or the post or both.

Sorry I don't have a solution, but I wanted to pass on the warning.

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Unfortunately, the guard your link sent me to is only for...

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That said, I live six miles from Wunderlich; I'll stop by with my GS after I get the post straightened and see if they have something that would work.
 

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Common, let's not be paranoid. SRC guard looks perfect. They do a good quality and solid stuff. I ordered one from Thailand where they are located.
 

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The SRC guard looks like it has a single mounting point. If true, that's not enough. Given the cost I expect to pay for the repair of my supposedly guarded side stand sensor/post, it's not paranoia.
 

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in my off-road bikes, I used to disconnect the switch. other than for the above reasons, in some difficult situations, I want to be able to start driving the bike when the kickstand is still open. Since I do not use 310 for serious off-roading, but just for regular and very bad roads, I keep the switch, and it looks to me that with metal guard, the chance of a stone bending is somehow is very small. s..t can happen, but so with many other things and accidents.
 
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