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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I am thinking of what would be the easiest way to transport my BMW G310 GS with a car, with a normal B class drivers license (I am not sure if I can tow big trailers). So far what I've found, I have two options.

First one with a rack mounted to the car (as seen on the first image), although I'm not sure about the laws, the bike covering the lights and registration plates and also the weight that the bike would add.

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Second option, a small trailer. This type of trailer also seems like a really good option, since it's not a big/long trailer, the weight of the motorcycle won't be as big of an issue as the first option, and plus it has lights attached to it.

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Anyone to share their experiences on this topic? Thanks.
 

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The safest option is a trailer. The bumper haul work well for light bikes but the 310 isn’t really a light weight. It’s lots of stress on your hitch. Depending on your trailer, this also allows to haul a compadre.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The safest option is a trailer. The bumper haul work well for light bikes but the 310 isn’t really a light weight. It’s lots of stress on your hitch. Depending on your trailer, this also allows to haul a compadre.
Yup, that was my biggest concern about the bumper haul, the weight.. sadly I am left with the second option only. I'd only consider a trailer like one on the second image (I can't deal with a long one, plus I don't want to go for additional drivers license classes).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here are the rules within the EU:
  • B driving licence: any trailer < 750 kg... thus no issue with a small trailer and one or two G 310 GS!
  • B + 96 driving licence: any trailer ranging between 750 and 3500 kg.
  • B + E driving licence: any trailer exceeding 3500 kg.
Well that's a relief.. I could find some trailer after all. Thanks mate.
 

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Agree with the trailer option.

Here in South Africa we've got a company that build these behind the vehicle carriers. These carriers are mounted on the undercarriage of the vehicles, in SA mostly on SUVs and puck ups. I recently posted a question on a local SA forum (wilddog.net.za) asking if this was a good idea. The opinions were split in more or less half: some said they experienced no problems having a 310 or lighter on the ramp. Some even say they put heavier bikes on Eg 1200 / Harleys. Others say it is a bad idea, too much weight on the rear of vehicle, instability of the vehicle, handling / contoll of the vehicle is affected by the rear weight, possible damage to the undercarriage etc.
I am not quoting legal aspects, as it differs from country to country.

What I decided after reading all the opions, is to rather get a small trailer. We’ve got some nice fold-up trailers that doesn’t take a lot of space to store.

Ps. above opinions is what I have read on our forums, not from my own expierience.
 

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Your vehicle's receiver/hitch has a weight limit. It should be in your vehicle's owner's manual or the instructions that come with the receiver/hitch. Find out what the weight limit is and make sure your fully loaded carrier or trailer does not put more weight than that on the receiver/hitch. As long as you do this, either solution is technically fine.

That said, you should also consider ease of loading. A high trailer/carrier is typically a two person loading job. I prefer a small low trailer that can be easily loaded by one person. If possible, before you buy, load your bike on the carrier or trailer you are considering to see how easy or hard it is to load.

P.S. The second picture you posted looks dangerous to me. I don't see anything keeping the whole thing from falling backward. I would never disconnect such a loaded trailer from its tow vehicle.
 

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I have a used Kendon Single Bike trailer that I haul behind a Honda Element. I think it is a 200 lb trailer hitch limit but I haul my G310GS frequently and the 4-cyclinder Honda easily pulls the trails loaded with the G310. Barely feel it behind me. You can find the used Kendon's $800 to $1200. The key is the trailer needs a good axel and suspension like the Kendon does and low enough to make for easy loading and unloading. I've had the trailer hitch and immediately got rid of it, to hard to load and way to much weight for my trailer hitch.
 

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I think it is a 200 lb trailer hitch limit but I haul my G310GS frequently and the 4-cyclinder Honda easily pulls the trails loaded with the G310. Barely feel it behind me.
The hitch weight isn't about the weight of the trailer or bike. Ideally, the bike will be balanced above the trailer axle and the trailers tongue will only put 10-15% of the loaded trailers weight on the hitch. That tongue weight is what should not exceed the hitch rated weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Your vehicle's receiver/hitch has a weight limit. It should be in your vehicle's owner's manual or the instructions that come with the receiver/hitch. Find out what the weight limit is and make sure your fully loaded carrier or trailer does not put more weight than that on the receiver/hitch. As long as you do this, either solution is technically fine.

That said, you should also consider ease of loading. A high trailer/carrier is typically a two person loading job. I prefer a small low trailer that can be easily loaded by one person. If possible, before you buy, load your bike on the carrier or trailer you are considering to see how easy or hard it is to load.

P.S. The second picture you posted looks dangerous to me. I don't see anything keeping the whole thing from falling backward. I would never disconnect such a loaded trailer from its tow vehicle.
Thanks for the tips mate. As for the second picture, I'd strap it good and I'd try to find a secure trailer. It's just that sideload trailer seems so smaller and easier to deal with. Plus, there are some that can be dismantled quickly and they fit in a car.
 

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Thanks for the tips mate. As for the second picture, I'd strap it good and I'd try to find a secure trailer. It's just that sideload trailer seems so smaller and easier to deal with. Plus, there are some that can be dismantled quickly and they fit in a car.
Mostly I meant it should be kept hitched to the vehicle until after the bike is off loaded. I like side loading trailers; I wish some of the European versions were available here in the states. I had a tandem trailer that loaded a bike from the side and the front wheels of a car on the back. I sold it because my need to tow a car went away. On the other hand, when a bike is broken down on the side of the road, with a side loader, you pretty much have block at least one lane of road, maybe even the whole road, to have room to load the bike. With a rear loading trailer, you can load on the shoulder or using just one lane. Something to think about.
 
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