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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I don't pretend this is a difficult task that really needs much explanations, but I realize a lot of the G310R owners are new comers in the world of motorcycling and I thought I could share one of the easiest, yet essential, maintenance task: oil change!
I also don't mean to refrain anyone going to its dealer to have this done. To each his own, I just prefer to handle all the tasks I can do myself, it's just something I enjoy. This way I am also 100% sure of what is being done on my bike. You won't save much time nor money doing this, but you'll probably gain some satisfaction and confidence along the way.
Service manual also describe pretty well how to do this, but sometimes it's fun to have real-life experience and pictures on the side. So let's start.

1- First step is fun, just ride your bike around the corner so the oil gets hot, it will get out of the engine easier this way!

2- Gather the parts and tools.
From left to right on the picture. Costs in Canadian dollars.
2 x 1L OEM Oil Advantec Pro 15W50 - PN: 83212365963 - 13$/liter
1 x OEM Drain Plug Crush Washer - PN: 07119963252 - 2$
1 x OEM Filter - PN: 11428562889 - 23$
1 x 8mm Allen Wrench
1 x 12mm socket w/ wrench
1 x Oil filter wrench. (I've used a "universal one", one of the socket-type fitting exactly the filter would be better but the ones in my toolbox were not the good size, so I've used a universal one.)
1 x Oil drain pan (not pictured)
1 x Torque wrench (not pictured and I did not use one in fact, up to personal experience/preference)


3- Have the bike to stand upright.
I use a standard rear-wheel stand for that purpose.


4- Remove the skid plate.
Put your head down and look under your bike for the first time! There are 4 nuts to remove there using the 12mm socket/wrench.


5- Place the drain pan under engine and unscrew the drain plug using the 8mm allen wrench.


6- Let that oil out get out
...and let's see if you had placed the drain pan in proper location or if your floor is a mess now :)


Taking a look at the drainplug, we see it has a magnetic tip that catched some metal shavings, this is perfectly normal especially right after break-in. There should be less of these small debris, if any, on the next oil change. Also be careful that there is a crush washer on the bolt, or else it stayed on the engine block (less likely). Usually you will replace with a new one but in case you didn't plan to do so, make sure you didn't loose this one in the oil pan...


7- Unscrew the oil filter.
Sometimes you can manage with bare hands but it seems mine was tight enough that I needed the tool.


Let drain...


8- With your finger, put a light coat of oil on the filter rubber seal.
This will ensure it screws in nicely without snugging and making a perfect seal.


9- Screw new filter in place.
Clean your hands (or gloves) first!
Once the base of the filter touched the base of the engine casing, I was able to screw almost one full-turn (maybe 7/8 of a turn?) with my hands. This is tight enough. If you use the tool to screw it, make sure not to over-tighten.


10- Clean the drain plug and fit new crush washer.
Crush washers are meant for allowing a perfect seal and they will "crush" a little bit, preventing you to over-tight the bolt. I often did not replace the crush washer systematically on each oil change, but I was told using the same crush washer over and over could damage the threads of the casing in the long run, it makes sense and for what they cost, I prefer to do it whenever possible.


11- Screw drain plug.
Recommended torque setting is 20Nm. I've done this so many times that I go on these by "feeling". Now your feeling won't be the same as mine so in case of doubt, use a torque wrench (and make sure you know how to set it properly or else you won't be in a much better position!). For more serious and precise engine work I will use a torque wrench, but for the drain plug not necessary in my case.

12- Pour some fresh new oil.
BMW Advantec Pro is supposedly a semi-syntetic oil blend. We know BMW does not produce its own oil, so there must be an equivalent in the big oil brands available for cheaper, but for now I'm sticking with it, at least for the time the bike is under warranty.
BMW mentions 1.7 liter when for a complete flush and filter change. For now you might put a little less to make sure you won't have too much at the end.


Before starting the engine, you'll notice the level seems too high, this is normal, there is no oil in the whole system (the filter is still empty).
Use a rag and clean all traces of oil around the drain plug and the filter.


13- Start the engine for about 1 minute.
Make sure no oil is dripping from the filter nor the drain plug (else revise all previous steps!)
Stop and let oil settle down, then check and add if necessary


This is what was left my 2nd container, so I've roughly used .. 1660ml of new oil.


Done!
Time to clean the floor, you don't want your tires to have any traces of oil on them.
Oh and good idea to check after a real ride also when the oil is hot and that is how the manufacturer recommends you check the level.
Hopefully I did not forget anything -- and do this at your own risk, I can't be held responsible if you FXXX up!
Happy riding!
 

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Thanks for the step-by-step tutorial. Do you just wash the drainplug with some dish soap?
I've seen my brother change the oil on his bike, but he doesn't really clean the plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the step-by-step tutorial. Do you just wash the drainplug with some dish soap?
I've seen my brother change the oil on his bike, but he doesn't really clean the plug.
Just wiped it with a dry rag and it became like new. The idea is really to get rid of the small metal flakes that the magnet captured.
 

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BMW oil changes are the easiest in the world. I encourage any new riders to learn how to do this; no need to be afraid!!!

Follow those steps above, ask questions when needed, learn about your bike, feel satisfied and happy at the end. :)

Nice work, @heap!
 

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BMW oil changes are the easiest in the world. I encourage any new riders to learn how to do this; no need to be afraid!!!

Follow those steps above, ask questions when needed, learn about your bike, feel satisfied and happy at the end. :)

Nice work, @heap!
The oil change I had to do on my BMW F650GS single (now known as the G650GS) was a pain in the backside actually. I much prefer Honda oil changes which are simpler than my G310R which you have to remove the belly pan to drain the old oil.
 

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Heap,

Beautiful article on oil change.
Is it possible to make something similar for maintenance of the chain ?

by checking the chain tension it is not clear how to do it.
Bike upright (with no center stand !!!!!)
Or
Bike on the side stand.

On the side stand the 'tension' should be between 40-50 millimeter (4-5 centimeter).
I check the tension today (already drove appr. 1500 km after the first service) and found the chain was to tight (serviced at my dealer's).
That might explain the worst changing of the gears !

I gave the chain more tension but was not able to test it (had to go to work)
The next two weeks I will be in the French and Italian alps with ..... the car.

Unfortunately not on the Beamer because the misses Has also vacation and she wants to come too.
Looking at her amount of luggage my 40 liter topbox and tank bag will not be enough space ........
 

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Great maintenance job to be doing and this is one of those thing that really make a forum like this what it is. Looking back at forums I used to be on, that's what I typically go back for now and they are what get the most views.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Heap,
Beautiful article on oil change. Is it possible to make something similar for maintenance of the chain ?
by checking the chain tension it is not clear how to do it.
Bike upright (with no center stand !!!!!)
Or
Bike on the side stand.
I'll keep your special request in mind, next time I adjust the chain if I have time I'll try to document it :)
As for your question the book is clearly mentioning the bike needs to be on side stand without weight on the bike when measuring the 40-50mm sag.
 

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I agree with the rest of the guys, great video for oil change I will change oil a bit more often than suggested, your video is a tile on my pc, thanks again.
 

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I do not claim to be an oil chemist/engineer but I will say that a full synthetic is not necessarily better than a part synthetic blend for this application. The water coolant/oil cooler on this engine attempts to regulate the oil temperature to the same temperature as the coolant in the system. Therefore, the oil temperature never goes much higher than 100 degrees C. For those temperatures a synthetic blend is just fine.

Also, the 6000 mile oil change interval is well within the life span of a a thick viscosity part synthetic blend. It is quite possible that several part synthetic blends out there actually have better shear resistance qualities than the full synthetics. Remember that the biggest threat to oil in a common sump system is the "shear breakdown" that the gears in the transmission cause. The best of oils will shear down to a low viscosity if ridden enough miles. BMW is recommending a 6000 mile oil change interval. I think that the gears in the transmission will shear the oil viscosity to a significant extent over 6000 miles. It is important to have an oil that is thick enough at the start, that after 6000 miles, it will still be thick enough to protect the moving parts. I think that is why BMW recommends the heavy 15W50 oil grade. In my judgement, a 15W40 would be fine for a 3000 mile oil change interval but I have not gotten an answer from BMW yet so I am not an authority here.

Some other technical considerations for selecting an oil viscosity revolve around oil pump capacity and high mileage plain bearing wear. The crankshaft bearings, the lower rod bearing and the balance shaft bearings are all automotive type plain bearings; not ball or roller bearings. For this type of bearing, it is extremely important to be able to maintain oil pressure. If the bearings are slightly worn, the oil pump may not be able to keep up the pressure because it is leaking through the bearings faster than the pump can pump it. This is why it is important to have an oil that is heavy enough to maintain adequate oil pressure when it is hot. And this is one reason to adhere to an oil change interval that will ensure that the oil does not shear down to the danger point where hot oil viscosity is not high enough to ensure proper oil pressure.

I know I have rambled off subject here, but the important thing is not whether it is full synthetic or semi-synthetic blend, it needs to be changed on a regular basis before it thins out and for that reason, the viscosity is also important.
 

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Guess you can't fill the filter before starting it up like you can on a car. I know there's no way around it but dang do I hate the thought of an empty filter.
 

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I agree!
Actually, you can fill the filter almost to the top and let it set for a moment to let the filter medium saturate and then fill it some more.

Then, just put some paper towel below the filter mount and be quick about getting the filter back onto the standpipe. You will be surprised how little you spill onto the paper towel!

I suppose if you are really particular, you could fill the filter up all the way and put the filter in a plastic bag and carefully put it into the freezer for an hour or two. That 15W50 is pretty thick at zero! That thickness should minimize spillage as you re-install. Then quickly install the filter onto the engine and wait 45 minutes or so to let the filter and oil come back to ambient temperature before starting the engine.

Willy
 

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It depends on where the filter is located in the oil circuit. If it filters after the oil has been through the engine then an empty filter doesn't matter. I don't know but I expect that this is the case.
 

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Oldtimer,

The oil filter is always just past the oil pump in the flow diagram. When the oil is dumped from the sump and the filter removed, most of the oil in the pump and the line between the sump and the filter mount drains out. After the oil in the sump is replaced and the filter replaced, it takes a few seconds for the pump to pick up oil and refill the line and filter. During this short time duration, the engine bearings have no oil pressure and the only lube is the residual oil in the bearing from when it was last run. This is the reason that the engine should not be revved until you are assured of oil pressure after the oil change. This is also one of the reasons why manufacturers recommend that the engine be warmed up before the oil change. Contaminated oil in the bearings with no pressure will cause more start up wear as well which is yet another reason to change the oil before it gets dirty.

But getting back to the main theme of the topic, if you are particular about reducing start up wear, you should put some oil in the new filter to reduce the time that it takes to completely fill filter and the system and get oil pressure to the bearings! If you are careful, you will not spill more than a few drops!

Willy
 
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